summer 2019 is here! A perfect moment to highlight the rich music culture of Suriname in weekly episodes. After all, the South American country is a melting pot of many peoples including Creoles, the descendants of enslaved Africans.

First, some history….


Suriname has a little more than half a million inhabitants. In addition to the original Native Paleo Indian population, the country’s largest population groups are Hindustani, of Indian descent, often Hindu but also Muslim, Creoles, Marrons, descendants of liberated and escaped slaves and Javanese from Indonesia. There are also many Chinese, Lebanese, Jews and Boeroes, descendants of Dutch settlers.

The first successful European colonization took place from 1650 by the Englishman Francis Willoughby. Freedom of religion was arranged to attract planters. The English started planting plantations in Suriname, using slaves as workers. Initially, the colonizers tried to use the indigenous population as slaves. This failed due to high mortality and resistance. Then planters decided to import slaves from Africa and partly from other colonies. During the Second Anglo-Dutch War, in 1667, the Dutch conquered Suriname from the English. The Dutch handed over the then newly discovered colony called New Netherlands to the English in 1674, who call it New York. In exchange for this, the Netherlands received Suriname from the English. Slavery in the Dutch colony Suriname was only abolished on July 1, 1863. The country became independent in 1975, known as the Republic of Suriname.

Suri-Funk

The Twinkle Stars

Funk and soul music are hugely popular styles in Surinam, widely known as Suri-Funk. The most famous and beloved band is undoubtedly The Twinkle Stars, also working under the name The Stars. This soul-pop group was formed in the 2nd half of the Sixties, made up of eight musicians plus soloist singer Oscar Harris. The group became very famous and appreciated in the Netherlands. Members were Alfred Ommen, band leader, Edmond Oosthuizen, rhythm guitarist & singer, Ricardo Wouden, drums and singer Oscar Harris as frontman. In the 70’s vocalists Billy Jones, Humphrey Campbell, Ruud Seedorf became members. Their music is a mix of Funk, Rhythm & Blues and Kaseko. The latter is a fusion of African, European and American styles, strongly influenced by Dixieland, Calypso, Rock & Roll and other styles, whose instruments include the use of drums, saxophone , trumpet and, sometimes, a trombone. The Twinkle Stars disbanded officially in 1973 but regrouped few times for live-shows and recording sessions until 1980.

Although The Twinkle Stars had many hits I would like to focus on a rather curious, even bizarre single that came out in 1971, Mr. Astronout. This song is loosely based on Bowie’s ‘Space Oddity’, with plenty of spacey weirdness and Oscar Harris singing ‘if Mr. Astronout had seen my baby on the moon?’. Surely a cash-in on the Apollo 11 space travels from a few years earlier….

Oscar Harris And The Twinkle Stars ‎– Mr. Astronout / Wake Up With You
Blue Elephant ‎– BE 24.008-G.

One of the best recordings by The Twinkle Stars is with Billy Jones, an American singer. His real name is William Oran Willie Bill Jones and he was born in Denison, Texas USA on November 20,1945. Billy Jones started his career singing gospel in church. He also toured the USA as a member of the Army Air Defense Command Choral Group.

In late 1968 he settled in Amsterdam, The Netherlands. He soon became a vocalist with Oscar Harris And The Twinkle Stars, where he stayed off and on until 1980.

Billy Jones & The Stars- Love Is Gonna Rain On You (Imperial LP, Album, RE (1977)

Featuring some superb funk cuts like “Funky monkey”, “Thank you” (Falettinme Be Mice Elf Agin) (Sly & Family Stone track), “All my brothers are clean” and “Message from a black man” !!!

Another rarity is this single ‘We Want Peace’ a Suri-funk gem that was released in Barbados on the obscure Merry DIsc label in 1973. Backed by ‘Jerusalem’, a typical example of that other most popular Surinamese dance style; Kaseko. More on that in the next episode of Soul Safari’s Caribbean Surinam Summer 2019….

source; Soul Safari archives/Wikipedia/Discogs

3 thoughts on “Soul Safari’s Caribbean Suriname Summer 2019 episode 1 – Billy Jones & The Twinkle Stars

  1. Great story Eddy, thanks! Kaseko en Surinam soul/funk are relatively unknown worldwide, despite the release of some nice compilations the last ten years or so. Equally unknown to most is the great Billy Jones, whose music I discovered years ago (I’m missing only two releases of his: the 7” single of “Message From A Black Man” and the 12” release of “Going Back Home/It’s Time To Get Funky”). These tracks started my interest in (Dutch) Caribbean music. There’s much more great music coming from Surinam and the Antillean Islands to be discovered. Keep up the good work! Bart

  2. I forgot to mention that “I Want Peace” was released in two different versions: the ‘Barbados’ version – laid-back, Carib-style – and a more uptempo funk version, couplet with deep soul track “Send Me A Lover” as B-side, released on the Dutch Imperial label. Both versions are great! Bart

    1. thanks Bart for your supportive comment! The Barbados version of ‘We Want Peace’ must be the original first press if I’m correct. The other version is unknown to me.
      You are absolutely right about the fact that there is still a lot of great unknown music from Suriname waiting to be discovered. I thought about that when I found a few amazing and rare Suriname albums last weekend. Then I remembered how many records were getting dusty in my Surinamese section….Do check out my posts on Caribbean Suriname Summer 2019 the coming weeks. Have a great summer!

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s