Spring -The Chris Schilder Quintet featuring Mankuku

Spring 2014

 

 

 

 

 

  spring has finally arrived here in Holland and the whole world seems to change.  The sweet smell of flowers in bloom, the soothing mild temperature, the right mood to select a fitting soundtrack. On my last South African record safari I was quite surprised to find this exceptionally rare LP, the vinyl is in quite good condition, but the cover is missing the front. Oh well, it is easier to find a raw diamond in the sands of Namibia then to locate a black Jazz album in South Africa.

The most surprising element came when I looked up this release on flatinternational and found out that my copy was released in 1974 on the UP UP UP label. The release on Atlantic City dates from 1979  so I guess this must be the very first pressing unless some whizkidd proves me wrong.

chris schilder quintet -cover back gecomp

chris schilder quintet -spring label A gecomp_1

chris schilder quintet -spring label B gecomp_1

chris schilder + Phillip

 

gilbert matthews pic

mankunku pic

 

CHRIS SCHILDER QUINTET FEATURING MANKUNKU
SPRING

TRACK LISTING

1.1 Spring
(Chris Schilder)
1.2 Before the Rain and After
(Chris Schilder)
1.3 Look Up
(Chris Schilder)
2.4 The Birds
(Chris Schilder)
2.5 You Don’t Know What Love Is
(Raye, De Paul)

ARTISTS

CHRIS SCHILDER – piano
WINSTON ‘MANKUNKU’ NGOZI – tenor sax
GARRY KRIEL – guitar
PHILLIP SCHILDER – bass
GILBERT MATTHEWS – drums

Reissued on CD by Gallo Record Company in 2007. The CD features Mankunku’s first two albums and is titled Yakhal’ Inkomo after his first record became South Africa’s best selling jazz record of all time. Spring is Mankunku’s second and it’s scarcity can be attributed to a fire at the EMI factory which destroyed the original master tapes.

source: flatinternational

Barbara Thomas 1952 African jazz variety

 On Jan 23, 2014 reader Earle Thomas left this comment on my post about African Jazz & Variety -Alfred Herbert 1952

 “ She is my granny Barbara Thomas ! 1952 African jazz variety”

…and posted this rare pic from his family photo archive. Well appreciated and thanks for your comment.

Barbara Thomas on stage
Barbara Thomas on stage in 1952

Township Jive & Kwela Jazz volume 2 -listen here!

 

well, thanks to all people involved for the great reception of our new compilation ‘Township Jive & Kwela Jazz volume 2’.

The LP is now widely available while stocks last -limited edition of 500 copies-. And Volume 1 is back in stock!

Available here or see iTunes downloads 

The launch at Tommy Page in Amsterdam last December was a huge success, the combination of vintage clothing and music worked wonders. What a great crowd, what a warm reception of the album on a wintery Sunday afternoon, downtown Amsterdam.

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The Dutch press also picked up the album quite early, Stan Rijven of Trouw being the very first. And Sjeng Stokkink wrote a positive article in jazz magazine Jazzism -TJ&KJ volume 2 

And eventually you can listen to the full album on Radio 6 Soul Jazz Luisterpaal. It is on for a limited time only, so don’t sleep.

There is also TV exposure! VPRO Vrije Geluiden has taped a special on the album, with an interview and I will be spinning some tunes from the album as well. The special includes live performances by myself, the Ives Ensemble which plays the rarely performed Chamber music of the American avant-garde composer Charles Ives. Also the group Flip Noorman presented their new album “Bellse Parese” and the amazing Maroccan singer Laïla Amezian gave a titillating performance. What a Voice!  The show lasts for 50 minutes and is in the Dutch language but the music speaks for itself.

The broadcast will be on Sunday, January 19, 2014 in Netherlands 1 at 10:30 h. The show will be broadcasted again on Saturday, February 1 (!) In 2014 to 09.00 at channel Netherlands 1.

Cultura repeats this broadcast on Wednesday, January 22 at 23:00 and Thursday, January 23 at 19:00.

Also on the website http://www.vpro.nl/vrijegeluiden, and other platforms of the Public Broadcasting as Uitzending gemist and VPRO YouTube channel.

Now how is that for a flying start?!

Happy New Year! Chris McGregor’s Brotherhood Of Breath ‎– Live At Willisau

my last post of this year features free jazz and improvisation by a big-band created in the late 1960s by South African pianist/composer Chris McGregor. Rare pics from the Brotherhood Of Breath live in Nancy, France 1975, from Atem magazine. Imo, side A from this album is a perfect soundtrack to blow out the Old and welcome the New Year 2014! Go Bang…

see also Chris McGregor’s Brotherhood Of Breath -1971

my best wishes for the New Year 2014 to all readers of this blog.

Chris McGregor's Brotherhood Of Breath
Chris McGregor’s Brotherhood Of Breath

chris mcgregor's brotherhood of breath cover

chris mcgregor's brotherhood of breath cover -back

chris mcgregor's brotherhood of breath label side 1

Chris McGregor’s Brotherhood Of Breath ‎– Live At Willisau, Switzerland

Tracklist

A1 Do It 9:54

A2 Restless 2:38

A3 Kongi’s Theme 6:45

B1 Tungi’s Song 6:45

B2 Ismite Is Might 4:30

B3 The Serpents Kindly Eye 8:30

released on Ogun Records ‎– OG 100 in the UK in 1974

Chris McGregor's Brotherhood Of Breath
Chris McGregor’s Brotherhood Of Breath

Credits

Alto Saxophone – Dudu Pukwana

Conductor, Piano – Chris McGregor

Double Bass – Harry Miller

Drums – Louis Moholo

Mixed By – Keith Beal

Recorded By – Roland Janz

Tenor Saxophone – Evan Parker, Gary Windo

Trombone – Nick Evans, Radu Malfatti

Trumpet – Harry Beckett, Marc Charig, Mongezi Feza

Written-By – Chris McGregor (tracks: A1 to A3, B2, B3), Tungi Oyelana* (tracks: B1)

source Discogs.com

your guide to Cape Town Slang -on ‘Township Jive & Kwela Jazz Volume 2’

a few kwela tunes on  ‘Township Jive & Kwela Jazz Volume 2’ start with some jive talking in an unknown language. At first I thought it sounded quite like Afrikaans,  with a pinch of  Zulu or Xhosa in da mix maybe? After all, South Africa claims 11 official languages and in a city like Cape Town that’s home to an eclectic mix of cultures it is easy to hear this sort of street jive.  In the 1950’s,  the neighbourhood District Six near Cape Town was the birthplace of an extremely lively and eclectic brew of a patois spoken mainly amongst the Cape Coloreds and certain groups of blacks, hottentots, Cape Malay and the Khoi San.

The Apartheid regime brought an extremely uncertain time for black and colored people so a slang as a sort of protection shield was born. At the time black music  did not get much national radio coverage at all, although some black radio stations broadcasted for local communities. The music was  either played live in the streets -the birthplace of kwela- or experienced in theatres and public halls. Left wings white South Africans, politically open minded people also found their way to these local get-togethers to hear some of the finest black and colored musicians on the scene.

The spoken intro’s of some of the kwela songs are characteristic conversations between the musicians, often in a humoristic slang, always extremely funny. Here are 3 examples culled from ‘Township Jive & Kwela Jazz Volume 2’ and translated into English as accurate as possible.

Track nr. 7 ‘Ek Se Cherry ‘by Lemmy Special and The Mofolo Kids;  a conversation between a man and a woman who argue about the man’s infidelity to his wife. The woman tells the man that people in the township are talking about his behaviour,that he is seeing a ‘cherry’ ( a loose woman). The man denies but the woman teases him and tells the man firmly –Ek sê Cherry – ‘I say that you are seeing a loose woman’.

Ek sê, Eksê (Eh-k-s-eh): Afrikaans for, ‘I say’. Used either at the beginning or end of a statement. “Ek sê my bru, let’s braai tomorrow.” “This party is duidelik, ek sê!”

Track nr. 5 ‘Skanda Mayeza’ by The Benoni Flute Quintet translates as such; “Yes folks, the man heard from you so nice as Two Kop Pak. All must raise the roof. Where is it going with you and old Two Kop Pak. Carly from the Kasbahs. There were the day never was a grass. The life was nice like the cabin in the sky. Go Totsi.”

Track nr 8 ‘Broadway’ by Alexander Sweet Flutes translates as such; ” Hey men, have you heard of the Bell -telephone call-? How Edward, how Space and how Azaren can really really mean what the Tow Can dobbo”.

Thanks to Susie Mullins and Kevin for the research and the translation.

TownshipJiveKwelaJazzVol2 front

See also Your Guide to Cape Town Slang

Awê, get the low-down on the Mother City’s colourful colloquialisms and sayings, ek sê…

Ag (ah-ch): An expression of irritation or resignation. “Ag no man!” “Ag, these things happen”

Awê (ah-weh): A greeting. “Awê, brother!”

Babbelas (bah-bah-luss): Derived from the isiZulu word, ‘i-babalazi’, meaning drunk; adopted into the Afrikaans language as a term for ‘hangover’. “I have a serious babbelas!”

Bakkie (bah-kee): 1. A bowl. “Put those leftovers in a bakkie.” 2. A pick-up truck.  “We all jumped on the back of my dad’s bakkie and went to the beach.”

Befok (buh-fawk): 1. Really good, amazing, cool. “The Symphonic Rocks concert is going to be befok!” 2. Crazy, mad, insane. “You tried to put your cat in the braai? Are you befok?”

Bergie (bear-ghee): Derived from berg, Afrikaans for ‘mountain’. Originally used to refer to vagrants living in the forests of Table Mountain, the word is now a mainstream term used to describe vagrants in Cape Town.

Bra (brah), bru (brew): Derived from broer, Afrikaans for ‘brother’; a term of affection for male friends; equivalent to dude. “Howzit my bru!” “Jislaaik bra, it’s been ages since I last saw you!”

Braai (br-eye): Barbeque (noun and verb). “Let’s throw a tjop on the braai.” “We’re going to braai at a friend’s house.”

Duidelik (day-duh-lik): Cool, awesome, amazing. “That bra’s car looks duidelik!”

Eish (ay-sh): isiZulu interjection; an exclamation meaning ‘oh my’, ‘wow’, ‘oh dear’, ‘good heavens’. A: “Did you hear? My brother got into a fight with a bergie!” B: “Eish! Is he hurt!”

Eina (Ay-nah): An exclamation used when pain is experienced, ‘ouch!’. “Eina! Don’t pinch me.”

Entjie (eh-n-chee): A cigarette. “Come smoke an entjie with me.”

Guardjie, gaatjie (gah-chee): The guard who calls for passengers and takes in the money on a minibus taxi.

hhayi-bo (isiZulu), hayibo (isiXhosa) (haai-boh): An interjection meaning ‘hey’; ‘no way’.“Hayibo wena, you can’t park there!”

Howzit (how-zit): A greeting meaning ‘hi’; shortened form of ‘how’s it going?’

Is it?: Used as acknowledgement of a statement, but not to ask a question – as one might assume. Most closely related to the English word ‘really’. A: “This guy mugged me and said I must take off my takkies!” B: “Is it?”

Ja (yaah): Afrikaans for ‘yes’. A: “Do you want to go to a dance club tonight?” B: “Ja, why not?”

Ja-nee (yah-near): Afrikaans for yes-no. Meaning ‘Sure!’ or ‘That’s a fact!’ Usually used in agreement with a statement. A: “These petrol price hikes are going to be the death of me.” B: “Ja-nee, I think I need to invest in a bicycle.”

Jol (jaw-l): (noun and verb) 1. A party or dance club. “We’re going to the jol.” “That party was an absolute jol!” 2. Used to describe the act of cheating. “I heard he was jolling with another girl.”

Jislaaik (yiss-like): An expression of astonishment. “Jislaaik, did you see that car go?”

Kak (kuh-k): 1. Afrikaans for ‘shit’.  Rubbish, nonsense, inferior, crap or useless. “What a kak phone.” “Your driving is kak.”  2. Extremely, very. “That girl is kak hot!”

Kwaai (kw-eye): Derived from the Afrikaans word for ‘angry’, ‘vicious’, ‘bad-tempered’.  Cool, awesome, great. “Those shoes are kwaai.”

Lekker (leh-kah): 1. Nice, delicious. “Local is lekker!” 2. Extremely, very. “South Africans are lekker sexy!”

Mielie (mee-lee): Afrikaans term for corn, corn-on-the-cob.

Nee (nee-ah): Afrikaans for ‘no’.

Naartjie (naah-chee): Afrikaans term for citrus unshiu, a seedless, easy peeling species of citrus also known as a ‘satsuma mandarin’.

Potjie, potjiekos (poi-kee-kaws): Afrikaans term for pot food/stew comprised of meat, chicken, vegetables or seafood slow-cooked over low coals in a three-legged cast iron pot.

Shame: A term of endearment and sympathy (not condescending). “Ag shame, sorry to hear about your cat.” “Oh shame! Look how cute your baby is!”

Shisa Nyama (shee-seen-yah-mah): isiZulu origin – while shisa means ‘burn’ or to be hot and nyama means ‘meat’, used together the term means ‘braai’ or ‘barbeque’. “Come on, let’s go to Mzoli’s for a lekker shisa nyama!”

Sisi (see-see): Derived from both isiXhosa and isiZulu words for sister, usisi and osisi (plural). “Hayibo sisi, you must stop smoking so many entjies!”

Sosatie (soo-saah-tees): Kebabs, skewered meat. “Let’s throw a few sosaties on the braai.”

Takkies (tack-kees): Trainers, sneakers, running shoes. “I want to start running, again but I need a new pair of takkies.”

Tjommie, chommie (choh-mee): Afrikaans slang for ‘friend’. “Hey tjommie, when are we going to the beach again?”

Vrot (frawt): Rotten; most often used to describe food that’s gone off or a state of being sick. “Those tomatoes are vrot.” “Champagne makes me feel vrot!”

Voetsek (foot-sek): Afrikaans for ‘get lost’, much like the British expression, ‘bog off’. “Hey voetsek man!”

Wena (weh-nah): isiXhosa and isiZulu for ‘you’. “Hey wena, where’s the R20 you owe me?”

Wys (vay-ss): Show, tell, describe. “Don’t wys me, I know where I’m going.”

So, whether you’re asking for directions, engaging with the locals or just eavesdropping in a taxi, let’s hope this guide will give you some insight into what’s being said. And keep in mind, if anyone says “Joe Mah Sah…” just know, it’s not a compliment.

by Meagan Hamman

spokes mashiyane -king kwela gecomp

Township Jive & Kwela Jazz Volume 2 -Available Now!

It’s official folks! Soul Safari is proud to announce the release of our second compilation in collaboration with the  International Library of African Music (ILAM), Grahamstown, South Africa. 18 rare gems of Township Jive & Kwela Jazz from South Africa recorded between 1930-1962.

Official date of release; November 18th 2013 

Available now in LP, CD  formats and iTunes downloads!

18 tunes of raw kwela and pennywhistle jive, great rhythm & blues, accordion jive and vocal jazz; true messages of joy and hope recorded between 1930-1962 in South Africa.

iTunes downloads 

TownshipJiveKwelaJazzVol2 front

Tracklisting 

side A

1          Flying Jazz Twist -Twisting Sisters (1960) 2’.20”

2          Johnny -Twisting Sisters (1960) 2’.25”

3          Sesir Inyembezi -The Batchelors featuring ThokoTomo (1962) 2’.19”

4          Tshidi -Martindale All Stars (1960) 1’.57”

5          Skanda Mayeza -Benoni Flute Quintet (1930) 2’.26”

6          Quintet Special -Benoni Flute Quintet (1930) 2’.59”

7          Ek Se Cherry -Lemmy Special and the Mofolo Kids (1960) 2’.28”

8          Broadway -Alexander Sweet Flutes (1960) 2’.55”

9          Jacko Mambo -Aron & Pieter (1956) 2’.41”

side B

1          Ziyavuma Mambo -Aron & Pieter (1956) 2’.34”

2          Baya Ndi Nemeza -The Skylarks with Miriam Makeba (1962) 2’.31”

3          Paulina -The V Dolls (1940) 2’.14”

4          Egoli -Mighty Queens (1940) 2’.17”

5          Sala Sithandwa -Mighty Queens (1940) 2’.10”

6          Teku Special -Richard Nombali (1960) 2’.22”

7          Nozipho -Ndlovu Brothers (1960) 2’.16”

8          Ubundibetelantoni -Sample Siroqo (1960) 2’.34”

9          7-2-7 -Kid Ma Wrong Wrong (1940)   2’.15”

 

TownshipJiveKwelaJazzVol2

This compilation ℗ + © Ubuntu Publishing 2013. All rights reserved.

latest record finds -October 2013 USA

my last safari through the concrete jungle of cities like New York City and Philadelphia generated a lot of great finds, not just African music but a few  interesting otherwordly records as well. What about The Afro-Latin Soultet ‘Wild!’, a truely rare jazz-soul gem rarely seen in the wild.

Best catch of this safari must be the American release of Spokes Mashiyane’s  LP ‘King Kwela’, recorded during his  first US live tour,  The Boyoyo Boys ‘Back In Town’, Josef Marais, and Dorothy Masuka ‘Pata Pata’ as runner up… maybe not the holy grails I was looking for in the first place but still a decent selection of music from the African diaspora that I like to share with you. More info and mp3 files in coming posts….and my experience of diggin’ in Philadelphia will be revealed shortly.

the afro-latin soultet -wild! gecomp

abdullah ibrahim- water from an ancient well gecomp

see also SA Jazz -Abdullah Ibrahim speaks! Staffrider interview with poet Hein Willemse NYC Dec 1986

boyoyo boys -back in town gecomp

see also David Thekwane & The Boyoyo Boys -Township Jive 1977

dorothy masuka -pata pata gecomp

see also South African Soul Divas pt 2 Dorothy Masuka, Mahotella Queens, Irene & The Sweet Melodians

hi-life intl -gecomp josef marais -songs of the african veld gecomp

see also the Bleached Zulu

majuba ost -gecomp

rare South African OST ‘Majuba’. I will review this LP shortly

next stop soweto vol 3 gecomp

ah…all the essential and most collectable Cape Jazz holy grails on a double album, released by Strut Records in 2010.

phezulu eqhudeni -gecomp rochereau tabu ley & l'african fiesta vol 2 gecomp spokes mashiyane -king kwela gecomp tabu ley babeti soukous gecomp

Township Jive & Kwela Jazz Volume 2

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The second Soul Safari compilation features 18 rare gems of Township Jive & Kwela Jazz from South Africa.

Released as a 180 grams premium vinyl LP and iTunes downloads.

Date of release: 18th November 2013

TownshipJiveKwelaJazzVol2 front

18 tunes of raw kwela and pennywhistle jive, some great rhythm & blues, accordion jive and vocal jazz; true messages of joy and hope that were recorded between 1930 -1962.

Tracklisting 

side A

1          Flying Jazz Twist -Twisting Sisters (1960) 2’.20”

2          Johnny -Twisting Sisters (1960) 2’.25”

3          Sesir Inyembezi -The Batchelors featuring ThokoTomo (1962) 2’.19”

4          Tshidi -Martindale All Stars (1960) 1’.57”

5          Skanda Mayeza -Benoni Flute Quintet (1930) 2’.26”

6          Quintet Special -Benoni Flute Quintet (1930) 2’.59”

7          Ek Se Cherry -Lemmy Special and the Mofolo Kids (1960) 2’.28”

8          Broadway -Alexander Sweet Flutes (1960) 2’.55”

9          Jacko Mambo -Aron & Pieter (1956) 2’.41”

side B

1          Ziyavuma Mambo -Aron & Pieter (1956) 2’.34”

2          Baya Ndi Nemeza -The Skylarks with Miriam Makeba (1962) 2’.31”

3          Paulina -The V Dolls (1940) 2’.14”

4          Egoli -Mighty Queens (1940) 2’.17”

5          Sala Sithandwa -Mighty Queens (1940) 2’.10”

6          Teku Special -Richard Nombali (1960) 2’.22”

7          Nozipho -Ndlovu Brothers (1960) 2’.16”

8          Ubundibetelantoni -Sample Siroqo (1960) 2’.34”

9          7-2-7 -Kid Ma Wrong Wrong (1940)   2’.15”

 

TownshipJiveKwelaJazzVol2

Most “African” recordings from 1930 -1962 in South Africa were issued only on breakable 78 shellac discs and poorly locally distributed in an era when Apartheid ruled. Few hundred copies a title perhaps found a home, if one was lucky to possess a record player.

The surviving discs landed mostly in collections and sometimes in air-conditioned archives, never to be played again. Until now, that is. A new chapter is here; volume 2 of Township Jive & Kwela Jazz, compiled by Eddy De Clercq for this blog.

Twisting Sisters -Flying Jazz Twist label

Feel the energy of pennywhistle jive by The Benoni Flute Quintet, a group that had a big hit with their recording of ‘Skanda Mayeza’ in 1930. The tune was originally recorded as a vocal and The Benoni Flute Quintet picked up the tune on their penny whistles; their playing of it established the tune as one of the all time favourite with the Africans. On this compilation the original humorous spoken intro is kept intact, later versions were released without this spoken intro.alexander sweet flutes -broadwayHear the battle of wild basslines in ‘Ek Se Cherry’ by Lemmy Special with vocal group The Mofolo Kids (1960). ‘SesirInyembezi’ is a superb Zulu cover version of the American original doo-wop hit ‘Book Of Love’ (The Monotones) by The Batchelors featuring ThokoTomo (1962)

Or listen to the delicious vocal harmonies of ‘Flying Jazz Twist’ by Twisting Sisters, a vocal group who were popular enough in the 1960’s for Gallo Records to release two hot sides on one platter. In 1956 Aron & Pieter did the mambo, African style while the festive upbeat vocal swing of ‘Tshidi’ by Martindale Stars (1960) remains timeless.

All recordings were prepared and mastered from the original 78 rpm shellac discs as found in the archives at ILAM in Grahamstown, South Africa. The goal was to clear the dust and dirt of decades gone by, while preserving the original dynamics and keep the sound as little altered as possible.

Richard Nombali -Teku Special label

This compilation ℗ + © Ubuntu Publishing 2013. All rights reserved.

Soul Safari presents Township Jive & Kwela Jazz Volume 2 (1930-1962) sneak preview

Words can not describe the sensation of compiling yet another collection of jive and kwela jazz shellac 78’s that were found in the ILAM archives in Grahamstown, South Africa.

Most “African” recordings from the fifties and sixties in South Africa were issued on 78 shellac discs and only compiled to LP for the “overseas/white” market in very limited quantities. So one can imagine how rare these records actually are.

The selection of Volume 2 of ‘Township Jive & Kwela Jazz’ features 18 songs that were recorded between 1930 to 1962. Most of these were no big hits, only The Skylarks with Miriam Makeba and The Batchelors featuring Thoko Tomo are the better known names on this compilation.

The latter knew some local success with their Zulu translation of an American Doo Wop original; ‘Book Of Love’ by The Monotones, a one-hit wonder, as their only hit single peaked at #5 on the Billboard Top 100 in 1958.  ‘Sesik’Inyembezi’ was also released as an ep on New Sound XEP 7025 where the two tracks of the original single by The Bachelors comprise the B side. The A side is by The Skylarks with Miriam Makeba. Interestingly the front of the ep sleeve features a photograph of and mentions only The Skylarks with Miriam Makeba – suggests that The Bachelors were very much the lesser act in sales potential.

All recordings were prepared and mastered from the original 78 rpm shellac discs as found in the archives at ILAM. The goal was to clear the dust and dirt of decades gone by, while preserving the original dynamics and to keep the sound as little altered as possible.

Here is a sneak preview of some of the selections that can be found on ‘Township Jive & Kwela Jazz Volume 2”. Full tracklist + mp3 review to be revealed in my next post. Do check it out!

kudos to Alex. Sinclair for sharing his knowledge 

The Flaming Souls -Oh Darling 1969 Atlantic City

as a bonus to my previous post The Flaming Souls ‘Soul Time’ 1969 South Africa here is another recording by The Flaming Souls, a 45 rpm single on Atlantic City, rarity from 1969 with vocals and a delicious funky breakbeat inspired by James Brown…enjoy!

the flaming souls -oh darling AYB1063the flaming souls -soul world AYB1063

The Flaming Souls -Oh Darling 

The Flaming Souls -Soul World