Best African music finds 2017 # 9 -Sandile –Uzuthuzweni EP

one post a day for the remainder of 2017 featuring a selection of some of my best finds of African music last year…not necessary brand new releases. Mostly vintage original pressings found during my travels all over the world.

# 9 Sandile ‎– Uzuthuzweni EP

Teal Records ‎– XPD 2479 South Africa 1986

Sandile -Uzuthuzweni cover watermarked

Sandile -Uzuthuzweni label A watermarked

I Won’t Let You Down   5:51

Hold Me Close  4:52

Sandile -Uzuthuzweni label B watermarked

   Give Me,Give Me           6:29

Producer – Ray Phiri

Produced by the late Ray Phiri of Stimela fame.  Two fantastic disco/boogie tracks and a soulful tune from 1986 by Sandile Ngema

See also

Stimela -Look, Listen And Decide 1986

Guitarist Ray Phiri R.I.P. (1947-2017)

Discovery of the Week -Thoughts Visions and Dreams -Ray Phiri

Best African music finds 2017 # 10 -Letta Mbulu –Kilimanjaro

 

one post a day for the remainder of 2017 featuring a selection of some of my best finds of African music last year…not necessary brand new releases. Mostly vintage original pressings found during my travels all over the world.

# 10. Letta Mbulu –Kilimanjaro – MJS 101

 MJS Records ‎– MJS-101 Promo, 33 ⅓ RPM  US 1981

Letta Mbulu -Kilimanjaro A side watermarked

  Kilimanjaro  Vocal Version       5:52

Letta Mbulu -Kilimanjaro B side watermarked

      Kilimanjaro (Instrumental)         6:00

Producer – Caiphus Semenya

Written-By – Caiphus Semenya, Letta Mbulu

This is the 1981 US pressing of one of the big boogie/disco-tunes by Letta Mbulu. Especially interesting since the B-side contains a great instrumental version…. Mixed with love by the legendary American producer Ray Martinez

see also Township Soul & Boogie Vol 13; Letta Mbulu -I’ll Never Be The Same (Mosadi) -Tamla Motown

hey sista, go sista, soul sista -Township Soul & Boogie

hey sista, go sista, soul sista -Township Soul & Boogie Vol 2

REFORM SOUND SYSTEM 2 DEC 17 JHB

reform 2 dec 2017

6 decades of soul, rare groove, springbok radiohits, township jive & kwela jazz, northern soul, girl groups, vintage disco, indie, funk, hip hop, nigeria 70s, dancehall and other rarities heard nowhere else….

Saturday 2nd December 2017 from 2pm-12 am

dj’s Charles Leonard, Marc Latilla, Eddy De Clercq (Soul Safari, Amsterdam), Mxolisi Makhubo, dj Jun (aka Ninja 45, Japan)

Eclectic laid-back afternoon session & dancing under the Johannesburg Skyline Sunset

The Troyeville Hotel
1403 Albertina Sisulu Road (corner Wilhelmina)
Johannesburg

entrance; 50 Rand

reform 2 dec 2017

August Special! South African Boogie & Kwaito – GROOVY G. -Viva Dance 1994

 

Today’s post shares a rare South African dance 12″ released in 1994.

Groovy G. consists of rapper and singer Marlon, ace muso The Big A and Funky DJ, muso and hot dance producer, the man behind the grooves on ‘Viva Dance’.

‘Viva Dance’ was produced by Patric van Blerk, the man who produced the mega hits of Margaret Singana in the 70’s,  besides successful innovative Dance compilations in the  80’s.

The mini-album features a mix of dance styles popular in the mid 1990’s, referring clearly to house, rap  and pop…but in a typical South African mellow vibe

Groovy G. -Viva Dance! (Tusk PVC 57 South Africa 1994)

Groovy G. -SOUTHERN JAM

Groovy G. -SOMETHING ABOUT YOU

Groovy G. -LOVE THANG

Groovy G. -GIVE ME A LITTLE TIME

Groovy G. GIVE IT TO ME

Groovy G. -lOVE ON THE DANCE FLOOR

 

 

South African Jazz Celebration on World Turning, WTJU Aug 18 2017

Tune in this Friday afternoon, August 18th from 12-2 for a special look at South African Jazz.  Joining us in studio on WTJU will be South African natives Wendy Grove and Lisa Grove, as well as Todd Leback.

 

Guitarist Ray Phiri R.I.P. (1947-2017)

ray phiri

Ray Phiri (born 23 March 1947, Hermansberg, near Nelspruit, South Africa – died 12 July 2017, Nelspruit, South Africa), whose guitar work reached a worldwide audience through his distinctive contributions to Paul Simon‘s hit Graceland and Rhythm of the Saints LPs, has died at the age of 70.

The BBC brings word of Phiri’s death, which took place at a clinic in the South African city of Nelspruit two months after he was diagnosed with lung cancer. He’d been hospitalized for several weeks, during which time he was the unwilling focus of a crowdfunding campaign to help defray his medical costs; according to an interview excerpted in the BBC’s report, he asked fans to let him “suffer [in peace with my] pain, on my own with my dignity.”

Phiri’s last public request reflects his lifelong approach to dealing with tragedy and misfortune. Among South Africa’s most widely respected musicians, he rose to prominence with his group Stimela (“train” in the Nguni language), a pioneering fusion band whose blend of smooth jazz with the Afropop mbaqanga sound proved popular — although not with the South African government in the apartheid era, during which Stimela’s records were occasionally banned and the state reportedly even tried spying on the group.

International stardom for Phiri proved somewhat fleeting — although his beautiful tone is instantly recognizable to anyone who listened to Simon’s music during the Graceland and Rhythm of the Saintsera, his tenure in Simon’s band was fairly brief given the massive success those albums enjoyed, and in later years, he alleged that he’d never been fairly credited or compensated for his work. Speaking with the Sunday Times, he spoke of his feud with Simon, but concluded — as he so often did — on an optimistic note.

“There’s bad blood with Paul Simon,” said Phiri. “He never gave me credit on the album for the songs I wrote, and financially we hardly got any royalties. But maybe I wouldn’t have been able to handle all that wealth. I sleep at night, I have my sanity and I enjoy living. The big rock ‘n’ roll machine did not munch me.”

In more recent years, Phiri continued to deal with personal struggles, including the death of his third wife in a 2014 car crash, yet he saw his musical legacy continue to grow — particularly at home, where the fall of South Africa’s racist apartheid regime opened an era in which his talents were not only acknowledged but valued by the state. In the wake of his passing, the African National Congress issued a statement praising Phiri’s inestimable contributions to the national culture.

“Ray Phiri was a voice for the voiceless and a legend of our time,” it reads. “An immensely gifted composer, vocalist and guitarist, he breathed consciousness and agitated thoughts of freedom through his music … He has played his role in unearthing and support new talent in the industry and has been an ardent and vocal advocate of the call for greater investment in local content development and the development of the industry as a whole.”

See also

Discovery of the Week -Thoughts Visions and Dreams -Ray Phiri

Stimela -Look, Listen And Decide 1986

banned records from South Africa

 

Kipper the Cat Show -Township South African 78s radio show

township-78-artwork

listen to this radio show with some truly rare South African 78’s like Black Duke & Peter Makana’s  “Baboon Shepherd” as featured on Soul Safari’s last compilation Township Jive & Kwela Jazz Volume 4 LP

On this edition of the Kipper the Cat Show an amazing selection of Township South African 78s can be heard.

The 78s cover roughly a ten year period from about1957 to 1967 (yes they were still making 78s in South Africa then) and amongst others features Kwelas, Sax Jives, and some stunning vocal harmony group records.

The tracks chosen were lovingly selected jointly by the Kipper The Cat team and afrrican Music specialists Lucas Keen and Chris Peckham.