Funk Soul Brothers -part 3 – City Soul -Dazz 1977

 

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City Soul ‎– Dazz -Jo’burg Records ‎– TJC 13026 South Africa

Dazz = Disco Jazz

Dazz was originally a huge hit in 1976 for Brick, an American soul funk disco quintet.  The track was covered in 1977 by a South African studio band formed around Julian LaxtonDuku MakasiRobbie Jansen and John Galanakis.

Today’s post features the full-length versions of this rare 12″ …enjoy!

City Soul -Dazz label watermarked

City Soul -Dazz

City Soul -Funky Dunky label watermarked

City Soul -Funky Dunky

 

kwela swingsters

 

Dance for All Juniors ‘Phepezela’. Choreography by Hope Nongqongqo

Music in this video: “Pennywhistle” by  Mango Groove | Mduduzi Magwaza / Sipho Bhengu

from the album Grand Masters Collection: Pennywhistle & Marabi

The Kwela Swingsters is Australia’s leading exponents of Kwela, South African penny whistle jive music!

Band leader Andy Rigby learned the Kwela style penny whistle playing while he was living in Botswana in the 80’s. The unique way of ‘bending”  the sound of the penny whistle gives the Kwela swing music its distinctive vibe.

With its rhythms rooted firmly in swing, add a lot of South African vibe and you have one happy dancing band.

The Kwela Swingsters have got many a foot dancing at leading Festivals in Australia:

  • Canberra National Folk Festival
  • Port Fairy Folk Festival
  • Fairbridge Festival

Lost Dreams; Grande Hotel Beira, Mozambique

In one of the grandest hotels in the world, born of and to luxury, today you enter ‘at own risk’. More than 2500 people live there without water or electricity. They have taken possession of the building and manipulated not only the stones but also the dreams. A journey through present and past of a city in a city; a story about colonial megalomania, revolutionary vanity and feeling at home.

grande hotel beira mozambique afbeelding

The Grande Hotel Beira was a luxurious hotel in Beira, Mozambique built by entrepreneur Arthur Brandão. It was open from 1954 to 1964, after which the holiday resort was used as military base and prison in the Mozambican Civil War. It has since fallen into disuse, and is currently home to numerous squatters, who have stripped the building of construction materials to provide a limited source of income.

Its failure wasn’t completely because of the revolution or government rule but the construction and maintenance costs were too high and they didn’t receive enough guests because of more affordable and better located competition.

In 1964, after ten years of operation, the Grande Hotel was closed by the Companhia de Moçambique. The construction costs were three times more than the original budget, and the hotel never made any profit. The anticipated number of wealthy guests never came and the workforce was too large for the amount of guests actually received. Every elevator, for example, had its own operator present. The hotel needed a lot of maintenance to keep it in its luxurious condition.

Listen to Kumbe Siyengetile [Mozambique] – Francis Baloyi, Sangaan Band

See also this Belgian documentary by  Lotte Stoops filmed in Beira, Mozambique in 2010. Winner of the Biarritz International Festival of Audiovisual Programming 2012

grand-hotel-mozambique.2

In several documents it was claimed that the reason for closure was the refusal of the regime to grant the hotel a casino permit. Any realistic estimation would have predicted the failure of the hotel. The white residents of Southern Africa couldn’t afford this level of luxury and Beira was not known, internationally, as a prime holiday destination for wealthy people. Destinations like the Bazaruto archipelago at Vilanculos, the Mediterranean city life style of the Mozambican capital Lourenço Marques, the South African Krüger national park and the Victoria Falls in Rhodesia where more famous across the world.

A cheaper alternative to the Grande Hotel was the Ambassador Hotel. This hotel opened just after the inauguration of the Grande Hotel and was preferred by business people because it was situated in the Baixa (downtown) area, where most of the business offices were located. Remarkably, Arthur Brandão was also the owner of this hotel.

Funk Soul Brothers – part 2-The Flaming Souls ‘Soul Time’ 1969 South Africa


the flaming souls -soul time cover

Already posted in 2013 but still such a real gem that I’d like to share again….a great LP by one of the best groups in soul-jazz style that ruled from mid 60s to mid 70s in South Africa.

Only a few studio-albums and a bunch of rare 7″ singles  are known. In addition to the information found on electricjive I add the lp ‘Soul Time’ by The Flaming Souls as today’s post.  This obscure group definitely deserves a higher ranking in popularity.

The Flaming Souls were produced by Teal record scout West Nkosi and members included Simon Twala, Philip Malela, Gerald Khoza, Herman Fox, Kenny Mosito and Condry Ziqubu. Their sound is based on a slow jam of groovy organ, guitar and funky drums, drifting loosely to the style of American counterparts like Booker T & MG’s with clear references to Newport jazz as well. Hence a title like ‘Newport Soul’ or the remake of ‘Take Five’. But it is  ‘Monks Beat’ that steals the show in this category.

the flaming souls -soul time back

‘Soul Time’ contains a selection of moody instrumentals and grooves that breathe African soul, jazz ala Jimmy Smith or Monk Higgins, even the instrumental organ-based period by James Brown pops up, when he recorded for Mercury/Smash Records.

Different South African indepent labels like Up, Up, Up and Atlantic City have released the group’s recorded output but only locally,which might explain why their records are so unknown and hard to get nowadays. Surprisingly in 1969 , ‘Soul Time’ was released in South Africa on Number One Records, a sub-division of the budget label MFP, Music For Pleasure.  Essential album that I like to share here today.

the flaming souls -soul time label 1

The Flaming Souls -Souly Mama

The Flaming Souls -Soul Again

The Flaming Souls -Monks Beat

The Flaming Souls -Something

the flaming souls -soul time label 2

The Flaming Souls -Take Five

The Flaming Souls -Fox, Monks And Souls

The Flaming Souls -Newport Soul

The Flaming Souls -Tremblin Soul

‘Soul Time’ by The Flaming Souls -Number One Records N.9022 (33YE 1005)-South Africa

see also Funk Soul Brothers -part 1 

Funk Soul Brothers -part 1-SUPER SOUL by THE SOUNDS 1974

The late 1960s saw the rise of American soul music in South Africa. Singers like Wilson Pickett and Percy Sledge were very popular, as well as the sound of instrumental groups like Billy Larkin & The Delegates and especially Booker T & The MG’s. The latter inspired many local South African musicians to enter the field with an electric organ, a bass-and-drum rhythm section and an electric guitar. The Sound of A New Generation was born and lasted until the mid 70s when disco took over…

Combined with a typical South African approach the sound evolved slowly into a funky soul-jazz mutation, released on small independent labels like Dawn or Atlantic City. But more on that later…

To kick off a new series of instrumental soul-jazz records in which I highlight some exceptional great local artists here is the LP SUPER SOUL BY THE SOUNDS on the Number One label from 1974 . Not much is known on the members of this band that  consisted of mainly session musicians; C. Dlathu who went to produce singer Paul Ndlovu later on in the 80s, C. Malete who was the drummer  in 1987 on Margaret Singana’s world hit “We Are Growing – Shaka Zulu”, B.D.Seathlolo and S. Msimongo. The music is a great mix of jazz, funk and soul, fantastic rhythms….

The Sounds super soul LP voor -WATERMARKEDThe Sounds super soul LP back-WATERMARKED

The Sounds -Super Soul

(Number One -N 9047-1974 South Africa)

The Sounds super soul LP LABEL a -WATERMARKED

Too Much

Real Kaapstad

Let’s Have It

Bushy Mayanka

Lost Feeling

Feel It

The Sounds super soul LP LABEL b -WATERMARKED

Thiba Kamoo

Coming Home

I Can’t Help It

I’m Sorry

Good People

Lonely People

JET RIDE!! LP cover art…airliners

 

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at Soul Safari we love great LP cover art…and travel by airliner. When traveling by plane was still glamorous fun….

 

bill meets vera TREK Airlines -watermarked
Trek Airways

Founded in 1953, Trek Airways was the only South African airline apart from SAA to fly international services. At the beginning, flights were operated from Europe to South Africa with one over-night stop. The aircraft used at the time was the Vickers VC.1 Viking. Since the Viking did not have the range for the operations, they were replaced by the Douglas DC-4 and Lockheed L-749A Constellation. Later on it operated the Lockheed L-1649 Starliner.

Trek operated from London, Düsseldorf, Vienna and Luxembourg to Windhoek and Johannesburg with two or three intermediate stops.

In 1964 a co-operation with Luxair was reached whereby Luxair took connecting passengers to other European airports.

In was in 1968 that the first jet aircraft was used when a Boeing 707 was introduced, but due to the embargo of South African registered aircraft due to Apartheid Trek had to suspend flights for a period of time. Those operations were re-established in 1991 and once again a co-operation with Luxair was established whereby Trek used a Luxair/Luxavia Boeing 747-SP painted in the old Trek color scheme. It was also during this time that Trek founded a subsidiary called Flitestar using Airbus A320 and ATR-72 aircraft. In 1991, politics changed again and the South African Government deregulated its aviation policy. Trek Airways applied for and was granted a license for a South African domestic service, in direct competition to SAA. Flitestar was born operating Airbus A320’s. On 11 April 1994, Trek ceased all operations.

the belgian quintet -holiday in Brussels watermarked
Belgian Sabena Airlines 60s

But the most favourite of this gallery of airline travel must be “Jet Ride!” by Duffy Ravenscroft. Simply for its space age artwork and the old South African Airways logo and cabin crew message system….

Jet Ride -cover watermarked

see also

Blue Elephant -Black Is Beautiful -cover art

10 Africana record covers

Jet Ride -pic detail back cover

Cliff Muskiet, a purser at KLM Airlines , has been collecting uniforms from stewardesses and flight attendants from the world of aviation.

His collection is now immense: 1443 different uniforms from 533 airlines and counting…. See his website http://www.uniformfreak.com/

 

international stewardes outfits

source: images from the EDC Vintage Records collection & wikipedia for the text

Nakhane Touré -raw as a fresh wound

 

Nakhane zanger foto  South African writer, actor and writer Nakhane Touré (31) will not be silenced. Resistance defies with a raised head, with a somewhat mocking look in  his beautiful androgynous face. His vulnerability is his strength, Nakhane is a queer artist on a mission.

Last weekend he was a defining artist at the Rotterdam music festival ‘Motel Mozaïque’ where he performed to promote his new album You Will Not Die’. An emotionally charged, loneliness-drenched collection of his own written songs in the soul and electro styles, in which he sings about his homosexuality and how he crawled under the yoke of a homophobic South African church community.

But not only as a musician does Nakhane attract attention, also as an actor. With his leading role in the controversial film of the South African director John Trengrove ‘The Wound’ (2017), he explained the taboo of being a young gay man in the Xhosa community. Xhosa is one of the largest ethnic populations within the Rainbow Nation.

The film caused a lot of commotion in South Africa when it appeared, although there was an Oscar nomination for best foreign film. After intense protests, the film was banned from the South African cinemas early this year. Nakhane felt broken as he mentioned on  Twitter; ‘raw as a fresh wound’.

Broken but not defeated, his music frees his soul he says. On his album ‘You Will Not Die’ Nakhane  raises all the heavy subjects and  taboos in his Xhosa community while coming out as a gay man; self-acceptance, finding an identity, anonymous sex, confusion, leaving his church and religion and finding his own spirituality.

nakhane you will not die album cover

source: NRC Handelsblad 19th April 2018- Amanda Kuyper