Best African music finds 2017 # 8 -Brenda & The Big Dudes -boogie/bubblegum 1984

one post a day for the remainder of 2017 featuring a selection of some of my best finds of African music last year…not necessary brand new releases. Mostly vintage records found during my travels all over the world.

#8 Brenda & The Big Dudes ‎– Let’s Stick Together

Family Records‎– FLY(V) 8 -South Africa 1984

brenda & the big dudes -let's stick together cover front watermarked

the early years of Bubblegum or Mapantshula Afro pop.

Legends like the late Brenda Fassie and the Big Dudes, Chicco Twala, Dan Nkosi, Ebony, Richard Makhubale of Volcano, Dan Tsahnda of Splash, Yvonne Chaka Chaka to name a few, are some of the most known South African artists in the genre. But the genre crossed borders as well, from Namibia to Zimbabwe, Bubblegum became most popular through the radio and rapidly captured the dance floor. Bubblegum was a response to Western styles like disco and the fast spreading house music which originally came from the black ghettos of Chicago and New York. When the second Summer of Love took the UK over in 1988, first house, and later techno conquered the world. DIY – do it yourself – a motto that had already appeared in the punk movement, lifted the young house scene to the next level. With a minimal set up – keyboards, some drum machines and samplers it was suddenly possible to make music without having to rent expensive studios. Township disco was born, Bubblegum was the next logical step, followed by Kwaito.

read the full article August Mix Special! From Bubblegum 2 Kwaito

 

brenda & the big dudes -let's stick together label A watermarked

Gimme Gimme Your Love

Let’s Stick Together

Could We Do It?

 brenda & the big dudes -let's stick together label B watermarked

Do It Now

Can’t Stop This Feeling

I Wanna Be Single

 

Brenda & The Big Dudes

Soul Safari Yuletide 2015 Mix -Township Boogie & Disco

Merry Christmas. Buon Natale. Joyeux Noël.

Geseende Kersfees (“Merry Christmas” in Afrikaans) from Soul Safari

Yuletide 2011 image 1

….in 2016 Soul Safari continues to post about long lost music from Africa …. and more.

A  blessed Christmas season and a prosperous New Year 2016 to all

let peace and love conquer

 

label bewerk 4

 

 

 this extended mix features rare gems from my collection of South African boogie and disco from  1977-1985.

Soul Safari YULETIDE MIX DEC 2015

Thandeka -Nkosi Sikelela

Kabasa -Burning Splinters

Kabasa -Happy Together

Ashanti -Keep On Dancing

Harari -Good Vibes

Masike ‘Funky’ Mohapi -Hamba Sibali Wami (pt 1)

Masike ‘Funky’ Mohapi -Hamba Sibali Wami (pt 2)

Hot Soul Singers -Give Me (My Love Back)

The VIP’s -Loading Zone

Abakhwenyana -Zikhe Thele

Pat Shange -Thembi

Abigail Kubekha -Tell Me

Abigail Kubekha -Tell Me continued

Malcolm Soul -Mr Cool

Quondile Nxumalo -Mad World

Mavis Maseko & The Movers -Living For The City

Sunset feat Hot Soul Singers -She Looks Good

Patricia Africa -Sala Sithandwa

Soul Safari X Mas greetings

vader krismis 2015

August Mix Special! From Bubblegum 2 Kwaito

the early years of Bubblegum or Mapantshula Afro pop.

Legends like the late Brenda Fassie and the Big Dudes, Chicco Twala, Dan Nkosi, Ebony, Richard Makhubale of Volcano, Dan Tsahnda of Splash, Yvonne Chaka Chaka to name a few, are some of the most known South African artists in the genre. But the genre crossed borders as well, from Namibia to Zimbabwe, Bubblegum became most popular through the radio and rapidly captured the dance floor. Bubblegum was a response to Western styles like disco and the fast spreading house music which originally came from the black ghettos of Chicago and New York. When the second Summer of Love took the UK over in 1988, first house, and later techno conquered the world. DIY – do it yourself – a motto that had already appeared in the punk movement, lifted the young house scene to the next level. With a minimal set up – keyboards, some drum machines and samplers it was suddenly possible to make music without having to rent expensive studios. Township disco was born, Bubblegum was the next logical step, followed by Kwaito. Brenda & The Big Dudes

1994 -the rise of Kwaito

The early 1990s saw many changes in South Africa; these include the release of Nelson Mandela, the lifting of political, economic, cultural and sports sanctions, an agreement on a new constitution and the country’s first democratic election in 1994. These changes inevitably dramatically affected the South African music performance structures and industry. The lifting of sanctions provided South African musicians with easier access to international music and a radical revision of censorship, while the easing political situation allowed for greater freedom of expression. Freedom of expression meant that for the first time the youth of South Africa could make their voices heard. The music genre kwaito emerged during this period and represents a culmination of all these changes; it is a practical manifestation of that freedom of expression for which the youth had longed.

The origin of the word kwaito comes from the Isicamtho word amakwaitosi (which means gangster). Amakwaitosi derives from the Afrikaans ‘kwaai’, which means strict or angry. The association of kwaito with gangsters is because kwaito in itself is all about ghetto music. To kwaito musicians and their fans alike, the term simply implies that the tracks are ‘hot and kicking’. kwaito comp The subject of kwaito remains a relatively unexplored topic within the academic environment because up until recently the focuses of musicological and ethnomusicological studies in Africa have been restricted to indigenous music, as opposed to urban music.

Can kwaito be deemed an authentic South African phenomenon?

A new urban genre developed in the 1980s, an Afro-dance pop, mainly influenced by mbaqanga and African-American popular styles. Bubblegum marked a shift or a cultural turn in the content and form of South African music. This genre developed because of promising developments in the fight against Apartheid as well as the introduction in South Africa of television in 1976, which allowed for the promotion of music across all ethnic groups. It represented a move towards music that was more urban then traditional. All these factors made an enormous contribution towards the development of kwaito, which began at the pinnacle of bubblegum music and when the aprtheid era was drawing to an end

Kwaitofabulous

Kwaito instrumentals are usually made entirely of synthesised sound. The tracks are constructed using a fusion of slowed down house music tracks (normally 100 and 120 beats per minute) and African percussion, which forms the core of the rhythmic pattern. The lyrics in kwaito are normally not sung, but recited in rhythmic speech, usually in Isicamtho or any of the South Afrcian official languages. Times are changing for Kwaito and the artists constantly pursue new sounds. Artists are spending more time on the production of their albums than before and have broadened their frontiers of influence. The music is becoming more developed and complex, with artists constantly seeking new idioms and mediums of expression like adding an opera singer or live instruments that give elevated status. Kwaito draws a lot of its traits from American hip hop and house. African-Americans (the pioneers of hip-hop and house) and black South Africans both have a similar history of oppression by the whites. Thus, there are similarities present between the original American music genres and kwaito but that does not make kwaito a direct descendant of hip-hop nor house. Kwaito draws its musical influence from various sectors of the music world, including American and European music, but also from various South African music genres and makes extensive use of local African instruments, for example marimba and xylophone, Izibongo praise poetry and, most importantly, lyrics that use indigenous South African languages as an alternative for English. For these reasons, kwaito can be considered an authentic South African phenomenon.

Source: partial text from the essay ‘Kwaitofabulous’ the study of a South African urban genre by

Thokozani Mhlambi

KWAITO EP 12inch_discosleeve

Cape 2 Nassau -August Mix Special

from 99.8 bpm to 118.2 bpm

Mara Dee -Uphetehe Yiphi Patleo4U -Abobaby Mara Dee -Phinda Mzi Street Vibe -Cho-Bee Dare 2B Different -Ash Lo Baby Malume -Uxam Binghi B -African Herbsman Bongi & Mashashane Kids -No Rubber No Pencil Bongi & Mashashane Kids -Black Mampatile Mara Dee -Rhythms Of Life Tata -Afro Breakdance Street Kids -Try Me (Game Nr. 2) Blondie & Pappa -Cape 2 Nassau

 kwaito dancing

Play of the day -Danny Mashinini – 2 rare unreleased boogie/disco tracks

Danny Mashinini Georgina LP

Danny Mashinini is best known for his album “Georgina” released in 1989. Today’s post features a rare white label promo by the South African singer with two exciting sides of boogie/disco. Not sure if these tracks were ever released or commercially available.

Danny Mashinini -Oseke wa Monyonyobela gecomp watermark

Danny Mashinini -Unqijwayela Amakheke gecomp watermark

Play of the day -Tata -Afro Breakdance -electro/boogie 1985

Each week during the month of March Soul Safari presents a selection of  exquisite South African boogie/disco rarities. Here is the much sought after 12″ from 1985

Tata -Afro Breakdance

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Tata -Afro Breakdance/It’s A Mess -Hot Stuff Records 1985 South Africa

Play of the day -Eric D -Slowdown/Nothing For Nothing -boogie/disco 1988

Each week during the month of March Soul Safari presents a selection of  exquisite South African boogie/disco rarities.

This week starts with a few tracks by Eric D from his album “Slow Down” originally released in 1988.

Eric D Slow Down LP

Eric D Slowdown/Nothing For Nothing -Sounds of Soweto SOS 2 -South Africa 1988

Eric D -Slow Down watermark

Eric D -Nothing For Nothing watermark

Backing Vocals – Mandisa Dianga, Marilyn Nokwe, Sipho Nkumalo, Thandi Seoka, Wake Mahlobo

Composed By – B. Bophela, T. Sothole
Guitar – Themba Mtshali
Keyboards – Barney Bophela
Producer – B. Bophela, T. Sothole
Saxophone – Mandla Masuku

Township Soul & Boogie Vol 12; Neville Nash ‘Wind Me Up’

Neville Nash 1981 2

 

Today’s post features all tracks from an early album by Nash ‘Wind Me Up’ released in 1981 in South Africa on his own label Nash

Neville Nash -Wind Me Up

Tracklist

A1 Wind Me Up  5:12
A2 Love Me Now 4:00
A3 Let The Music Play 3:53
B1 Funky Feelin’ 6:22
B2 Blame It On Magic 3:48
B3 Ooh Baby 3:31

Neville Nash 1981

Neville Nash and his band The Miracles parted ways when the South African singer went solo. By 1985 he had a big hit,”One Of Those Night”,which was later included in the Concert In The Park double album.”What’s Your Name,What’s Your Number?” produced by Tom Mkhise on the CTV label Solid. In 1986 he followed up with the album “Why?” which featured the hit “Feel It” produced by Tom Mkhise, Solly Letwaba and Neville himself.

Neville Nash

Township Soul & Boogie Vol 11-Jonathan Butler

Today’s post features an early record by Jonathan Butler, one of South Africa’s most respected and well known jazz artists in the Cape Jazz genre. Few people will know that this artist started his career as a teen idol in the same vein as Justin Bieber. The album ‘Spotlight on Jonathan Butler’ contains a selection of uptempo soul & boogie tunes and some classic soul ballads, produced by Peter Vee for Clive Calder productions.

jonathan butler front cover

Born and raised in Athlone, Cape Town, South Africa, during Apartheid, Butler started singing and playing acoustic guitar as a child. He began touring at the age of seven when he joined a travelling stage show, and was later signed up to perform on a string of hit recordings, turning him into a local teen idol. His debut single was the first by a black artist played by white radio stations in the racially segregated South Africa and earned a Sarie Award, South Africa’s equivalent to the Grammy Awards. In 1975 his cover of “Please Stay” by The Drifters reached number 2 in South Africa.  The same year his cover of “I Love How You Love Me” by The Paris Sisters reached the Top 10 as well.

jonathan butler back cover

 

In 1978 he found the inspiration and encouragement to begin expressing himself as a composer and songwriter when he joined Cape Town’s best known jazz/rock outfit, Pacific Express.

jonathan butler -die burger March 25th 2014
Jonathan Butler -clip from SA newspaper die burger March 25th 2014

Butler was signed to Jive Records in 1977, and in the early 1980s he moved to the United Kingdom, where he remained for seventeen years. His international breakthrough came in 1987 with his Grammy-nominated hit single, “Lies” which reached #25 on Billboard’s Hot 100 chart, and his cover version of the Staple Singers song “If You’re Ready (Come Go with Me)”, which he performed with Ruby Turner.

Butler maintained a loyal following in the 1980s and 1990s, in South Africa, the United States and Europe. In 2006,  he was a featured vocalist on the album Gospel Goes Classical, produced by University of Alabama at Birmingham music professor Henry Panion. This recording, featuring arrangements by Panion, Tommy Stewart, Michael Loveless, and Ray Reach, rose to No. 2 on the Billboard Gospel chart, and No. 3 on the Classical Crossover chart. He was also nominated for a Grammy Award for his single “Going Home”.

Also in 2008, Butler guest-starred on George Duke’s Album Dukey Treats, alongside the late Teena Marie on the track “Sudan”, talking about the disasters of Darfur.

jonathan butler label 1

Jonathan Butler -Our Love

Jonathan Butler -I’m On Fire

Jonathan Butler -Build It Up

jonathan butler label 2

Jonathan Butler -I Love How You Love Me

Jonathan Butler -Sunshine In The Morning

Jonathan Butler -Sending Out An S.O.S.

‘Spotlight on Jonathan Butler’ MFP 54748 -South Africa 1975

see also the official website of Jonathan Butler

Source: Wikipedia

Harari -Kala Harari Rock -Township Soul & Boogie vol 9


Harari -Kala Harari Rock album cover

“Kala-Harari -Rock” was released in South Africa at the end of 1979.  It was the group’s third album and the selection of songs leans heavily on their African roots. This is Harari’s first real return to Africa since ‘Rufaro’ which was the genesis of the Harari sound.

The concept of  ‘Kala-Harari -Rock’ is based the raw wildness of the jungle, translated into music acceptable to the Western ear.  File under Afrobeat, Funk, Disco. The standout track on this album is easily the instrumental ‘Soweto Sunset’ a mesmerizing funky groove, relaxed and powerful. Other favourites are’Safari’, ‘Jikeleza’ and ‘Elephant Dance’. But why not judge for yourself, the full album is available here on these pages for a limited time only. Enjoy!

Harari -Kala Harari Rock side 1

A1. Kala-Harari – Rock 5:18

A2. Give 5:22

A3. Safari 5:20

Harari -Kala Harari Rock side 2

B1. The Whole World’s Dancing Now 5:17

B2. Soweto Sunset 4:40

B3. Jikeleza 3:37

B4. Elephant Dance

see also the homebrew of Harari -Township Soul & Boogie pt 3 and Om’Khaoli -Magic Touch 1982 -Township Soul & Boogie Vol 6

Umoya ft Alec ‘Om’ Khaoli -Oya Kae 1985

see also Om’Khaoli -Magic Touch 1982 -Township Soul & Boogie Vol 6

Umoya-1985

 Umoya is a German based reggae band, founded in 1982.  Its name is Swahili for “unity”. Their EP ‘Satisfy/ Party / Feels Good/ Oya Kae’ was released as 12″ in 1985.  There might be a subtle difference in spelling the name but Umoja was formed in South Africa by Alec ‘Om’ Khaoli’s after leaving Harari.

This 45 rpm single “Oya Kae” was released that same year on CBS Records. The spelling of  the name of Umoja is confusing since the  German group recorded this seldom seen track. Alas, the pressing or mastering of this particular disc is not 100% but its rarity makes up for the sound quality.

Does anybody knows in which country this single was originally released??

Umoya -Oya Kae Pt 1 label

Umoja featuring Alec ‘Om’ Khaoli -Oya Kae Pt 1 

Umoya -Oya Kae Pt 2 label

Umoja featuring Alec ‘Om’ Khaoli -Oya Kae Pt 2 

a few albums by South African group Umoja