diggin’ in Japan vol 2; Osaka finds

after 4 days of serious diggin’ in Tokyo we boarded the train for another safari to Osaka.  My friend collector MP Flapp had been there before so again his guidance was invaluable.

The first thing that you need to remember when travelling in Japan by train is to buy a JR Rail Pass for unlimited travel by train, the pass is also valid for traveling on the JR line within the Tokyo subway. It’s easy and efficient and it saves a lot of money since travel by train in Japan can be quite expensive.

The city of Osaka was very pleasant after the hustle and bustle of Tokyo, it is a lot smaller compared to the metropolis and one can actually walk the city center. Which reminded me a lot of the old port of Amsterdam since it has canals, bridges and a funky red light district.

Namba is a good place to start hunting for records as there is a free map available detailing most stores in the district. Shinsaibashi is another era where some of the city’s more specialised shops like Timebomb and King Kong can be found. I avoided going into Timebomb since the shop is a real money-drain and  most of my wishlist can be found  in that shop but hey, sometimes one has to minimize.

Forever Records, Osaka

My favorite shops were the ones that sold African music like Vox and Bamboo and Forever Records, a store specialized in Krautrock (!) with a great selection of world and African music.

MP Flapp

MP FLAPP has published a more detailed post on diggin’ in Osaka here

some of the African finds so far

I will be reporting and listing the found records extensively here on Soul Safari the coming weeks with lots of pics and music to share.

The second volume of diggin’ in Japan  here today is about Osaka. Coming up is a special report on the Tokyo jazz scene with interviews with local collectors and friends. So do check out coming posts!

diggin’ in Japan vol 1; Tokyo record shops

metro Tokyo May 2012

Konnichiwa! The past few weeks my insatiable appetite for African music drove me to Tokyo and Osaka in Japan. Not the most obvious choice to find African music, I agree, but after a few serious digs my bags were filled with great finds, and some new discoveries too!

My guides collector MP Flapp and his friend Iain who lives and works in Tokyo, showed me around -thanks guys!

 Tokyo is without a doubt the biggest metropolis in the world and although the language is impenetrable for foreigners it was relatively easy to get around, especially if you have  a good street map.

Use the subway, it’s the best way to get around in this huge city, easy and handy once one understands the planning and structure of this excellent form of public transport.  And it’s economic too! All vending machines are operated in English and should you get lost then there’s always a helpful English speaking company employee coming to your rescue .

 Think of Tokyo as a collection of many cities and stations, each with it’s own centre/neighborhood where  most markets, shopping areas and record stores are concentrated.

Disk Union publishes an excellent catalog of Tokyo record stores and new releases.

A good map and list of places to go  makes hunting for the big five in Tokyo a lot easier…

Most shops are either ultra-specialised in one specific style or huge in terms of the selection of used -and new- vinyl on offer. Division and lay-out of the shops is quite well marked in English and the prices are relatively cheap, especially for the Japanese pressings.  There is always an interesting section of second-hand vinyl in excellent conditon. But don’t be fooled; it’s hard to find real bargains since most owners seem to know their merchandise -and the prices for rare vinyl- really well.

       The Goldmine grading system has been replaced for the Japanese version of it -using A, B, C as indication- but since the Japanese are keen on clean it is rare to find junk. Most of the staff working in the stores have a basic knowledge of English and are always helpful, a polite bow always works miracles as well.

Flash Disc Ranch

One of my favourite shops in Tokyo is  Flash Disc Ranch -at Shimokitazawa- Misuzu Bldg 2F, 2-12-16 Shimo-Kitazawa, Setagaya-ku, Tokyo 155-0031-  a big store one flight up the stairs under a manga-styled door, opened in 1982 with a great selection of R&B, soul, jazz. The specialty of the house is “cheapies”, lots of  it! Check the 45’s boxes, lots of great finds at Yen 100. The owner Masao Tsubaki speaks English and knows his trade very well.

Open 12-10 pm daily (Saturday 14.00h -21.00h). Sundays 14.00h -21.00h. Closed on Wednesday.

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Otonomad

  Within walking distance from Flash Disc Ranch is a small shop called Otonomad  that stocks an excellent selection of soul, jazz, world and some rare African vinyl. The selection changes with whatever the owner puts in the racks daily so do check these out as there are some treasures hidden in those bins. Excellent selection of CD’s too and there is a listening post…

Otonomad -3 minutes walk, 1F along the main street shopping district Shimokitazawa Station North Exit from First Avenue. Monday to Saturday 13:00 to 20:00 -Sun, Holidays 12:00 to 19:00 -Closed on Thursday.

Then there is the wonderful El Sur -1OF -1006 Miyamasuzaka Bld, 2-19-15 Shibuya, Shibuya-Ku, Tokyo (closed on wednesday) – not easy to find since it’s located on the 10th floor, we had to ask the postman-but well worth a visit for the best selection of African rarities and world music in general.

I asked the owner Takashi Harada  if he knew the Soul Safari compilation ‘Township Jive & Kwela Jazz’  and hey presto! -he pulled it out the rack in a flash!! Now Takashi deserves a cigar!!! The shop is also well  known for their own releases of selected rare  World music on the El Sur label.

EL SUR Records -directions -3 to 4 minutes from the East Exit of Shibuya Station. Go towards the direction Masuzaka Aoyama Palace, sequence right.Just after the bank, the Mitsubishi UFJ Trust and Banking Corporation, Resona, Pronto, pharmacy Higuchi, Matsuya you will a see a big old building <Building Masuzaka Palace> El Sur shop is located on 10th floor, Room 1006.

The entrance is in front of the frame shop.There is a lift to the right immediately as you enter.

Business hours are 2:00 pm until around 10:00. Closed on Wednesdays

TEL 03 (5485) 9967 FAX 03 (5485) 9968

your reporter & Takashi Harada

Noah Lewis’ Records

2A Dentobiru Shimokitazawa 2-23-12 Kitazawa, Setagaya-ku, Tokyo 〒 155-0031. Open every day from 9:00 – 12:00 PM -Closed Wednesday. Phone 03-3418-0161. Take the Western exit when leaving the Shimokitazawa subway station, walk along the rail and turn over the crossing, turn left and you’ll find the streetsign.

Noah Lewis’ Records

It may be the smallest record store in Shimokitazawa area, opened in November 2001, but it is a lovely collector’s shop with lots of interesting 78’s, 45 and 33 rpm vinyl specialising in 50’s R&B, Rock ‘n Roll, Doo Wop, New Orleans jazz and odd/weird records. It’s definitely one of my favorite places in the area since the owner speaks English and he plays the picks and advises on whatever you are looking for, very personalized and professional service. Reasonable prices too…

Noah Lewis’ Records
Noah Lewis’ Records

They also do mail order. Great finds in the shop and daily updates on their website.

Disk Union is a chain found in the major shopping centres of  Tokyo, their stock and selection is excellent and huge in terms of the vinyl on offer -both new and used. Check out the cheap Japanese pressings and the used bins. You won’t leave this store empty handed!

Do check out Disk Union’s catalog of Tokyo record stores and new releases. Definitely a must as it contains all addresses and opening hours, descriptions   in English of some of the key stores in Tokyo. Newly updated issues appear regularly at Amazon.co.jp or buy the catalog available at Disk Union stores around Tokyo.

during the coming weeks I will be reporting on the record stores of Osaka in volume 2 of Diggin in Japan.