Manu Dibango -OST ‘How To Make Love To A Negro Without Getting Tired’ 1989


This movie has it all: Interracial Sex, Female Nudity, A Very Long Title, Suicide Attempt, Profanity In Title and above all a script that is racistic, xenophobic, politically incorrect… but the soundtrack is a superb blend of Afro-Beat and atmospheric collages.

The Canadian production ‘How to Make Love to a Negro Without Getting Tired’ (Comment faire l’amour avec un nègre sans se fatiguer)  is based on the book by Dany Laferrière written in 1985. Today the film is as fresh and relevant as when it first premiered in 1989. With raunchy humor and a working-class intellectualism, Laferrière’s narrator wanders the slums of Montreal, has sex with white women, and writes a book to save his life. Racial and sexual politics collide in this cult classic that launched Laferrière as one of North America’s finest literary provocateurs like Jack Kerouac, Henry Miller, James Baldwin and Charles Bukowski.

Manu Dibango wrote a number of spherical snapshots and a few strong songs that are good to listen to without the accompanying images.

Manu Dibango -Lokobobe

Moreover, it is not his first soundtrack. In 1977 Manu composed music for the following films; ‘L’Herbe Sauvage’ (Ivory Coast), ‘Ceddo’ (Senegal), ‘Le Prix De La Liberté’ (Cameroun) and in 1987 he contributed his music to ‘Les Keufs’,  a French film by Josiane Balasko.

Manu Dibango -Bolingo City

Manu Dibango, born Emmanuel Dibango N’Djoké on 12 December 1933 in Douala, Cameroon) is a Cameroonian saxophonist and vibraphone player. He developed a musical style fusing jazz, funk and traditional Cameroonian music. His sound is a vision of the future; Afro-electro-funk-style. Manu defines himself as an African European. See also my previous post on Manu Dibango here

For  recent releases, concert dates and more info check Manu Dibango’s offical website.

SA movies -1965 OST ‘Dingaka’ by Bertha Egnos

good day to all! Over the last  week or so the  attention over here has been focused mainly on musicals and soundtracks from our favorite 50’s & 60’s South African movies.  Served here today are some highlights, a few unusual works of Bertha Egnos, one of South Africa’s most underrated and forgotten composers. A remarkable talent that produced one of  South Africa’s most succesful musicals ever and many scores for movie soundtracks, plays and pop music that crossed over to the hit parade. But how well remembered is Bertha Egnos??
A Google search for a picture of the lady did not turn up anything! Not even some documentation on her long career in movies and musicals was found although Bertha Egnos was quite famous back in the 60’s and 70’s.  I believe the time has come to reconstruct a few bits and forgotten parts of her long career. Here’ s part one…
In a previous post‘An African Lullaby (tula baba)’ from 1963 by Eva Madison and the Bertha Gray Singers was highlighted. It is a traditional South African folk song that mothers sang to put their babies to sleep. It was re-written and adapted for the soundtrack of the movie  ‘Dingaka’ by Bertha Egnos who was making a name for herself earlier with musicals like ‘Bo Jungle‘ in 1959 and who would later become responsible for the musical ‘Ipi Tombi’.
In 1972, Bertha Egnos and her daughter, lyricist Gail Lakier, produced ‘Ipi Ntombi’ and ‘Mama Tembu’s Wedding’ as the two African songs for Eartha Kitt’s tour of  South Africa. Although the numbers were rejected by Kitt for being “too upbeat and rhythmic”, Egnos and Lakier were undeterred. They added another eight songs and released an album called ‘The Warrior’  in 1973. Later versions became known as ‘Ipi Ntombi’, or even more simplified as ‘Ipi Tombi’.
Sure, from a critical point of view,  these  shows sentimentalized and celebrated the life of the rural ‘native’. This form of theatre in South Africa confirmed white attitudes and prejudices and is blatantly paternalistic in the long colonial tradition. But nevertheless, ‘Ipi Ntombi’ showed the world South African Zulu tribal culture at its best and popularized this at a time when Apartheid still ruled the Union.

The musical sequences featured on the soundtrack of ‘Dingaka’ were personally selected and edited by South Africa’s star actor-director-producer Jamie Uys.  The soundtrack was written by  Bertha Egnos, Eddie Domingo and Basil Gray. From a musical point of view, this soundtrack recording is without a doubt one of the most valuable contributions ever made to the ever-growing library of authentic African music. The songs reflect the colour, the driving rhythm, the vast panorama of sound and music which add up to what novelist Stuart Cloete once described as being ‘the song of Africa….the song no white man will ever sing’.
Dingaka tells the story of a tribesman, Ntuku Makwena, who avenges the murder of his daughter according to custom tribal laws. His act of revenge leads him to be tried under government laws, where justice for black people does not exist. The film stars Ken Gampu, Stanley Baker, Juliet Prowse and Bob Courtney.
excerpts from the original liner notes of ‘Dingaka’ Gallotone GALP 1385 released in 1965

the original soundtrack of ‘Dingaka’ can be found here

a VHS is available on eBay (updated 16th January 2015)

Cast “Dingaka” 1965

Stanley Baker -Tom Davis

Willem Botha-Court Clerk

 Bob Courtney-Prison Chaplain

 Ken Gampu-Ntuku Makwena

 Gordon Hood-Prosecutor

Alfred Jabulani-Mpudi

Paul Makgob-Masaba

Daniel Marolen-Priest

Sophie Mgcina-Choir Soloist

George Moore-Legal Aid Society Secretary

 Flora Motaung-Rurari

 Siegfried Mynhardt-Judge

 Hugh Rouse-Bantu Commissioner

 Jimmy Sabe-Leadsinger

 John Sithebe-Witch Doctor

 Simon Swindell-Doctor

 Thandi -Letsea

 Clement Mehlomakulu Tlhotlhhalemji-Priest

 Fusi Zazayokwe-Stick fighter

 Director

Jamie Uys

 Producer

Jamie Uys

Writer

Jamie Uys

Original Music

Eddie Domingo

Bertha Egnos

Basil Gray