Township Jive & Kwela Jazz -new Volume 4 (1940-1965)

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the fourth issue in the series ‘Township Jive & Kwela Jazz’ selected by Soul Safari.

Another outstanding collection of rare gems from the International Library of African Music (ILAM) Archives, South Africa.

Soul Safari presents Township Jive & Kwela Jazz Volume 4 (1940-1965)

Catalog nr. UP 2016.007 LP

Side A
1-Stamkoko -Izintombi Zesi manje manje (1965) 02:16
2-Udali– Maphela  (1960) 02:38
3-Sabela –Maphela  (1960) 02:30
4-Usana Lwam’– Mississippi Brothers & Beauty Diloane (1940) 02:36
5-Ukhiye–Susan  Gabashane & Her Honeybees  (1960) 02:46
6.Ukuhlupheka – Susan Gabashane & Her Honeybees (1960) 02:35
7.Umsakazo E Grahamstown– Alabhama Kids  (1960) 02:27
8.Lizzy–Mississippi Brothers (1940) 02:17
9.Asinamali– Alabhama Kids (1960) 02:21

Side B
1.Baboon Shepherd–Black Duke & Peter Makana (1950) 02:35
2.Battle Of The Flutes–Black Duke & Peter Makana (1950) 02:37
3.Shukuma Duke-Black Duke (1950) 02:27
4.Duke Blues-Black Duke (1950) 03:00
5.Black John–Peter Makana (1950) 02:20
6.Blood Mixture-Peter Makana – (1950) 02:15
7.Egoli Zinyozi –Alfred Dlezi & Dlamini (1950) 02:31

New volume 3 -Township Jive & Kwela Jazz (1960-1965) available now!

 180 grams vinyl, CD

A limited amount of ‘Township Jive & Kwela Jazz (1960-1965) volume 3’ in both LP -180 grams vinyl and deluxe CD formats -is now available  for readers of this blog exclusively.

20 euro including S&H as Registered Airmail (+track&trace/barcode) Worldwide!

PayPal account required. Volume 1 and 2 also available.

So here it is! Soul Safari is proud to announce the release of our third compilation in collaboration with the  International Library of African Music (ILAM), Grahamstown, South Africa.

16 rare gems of Township Jive & Kwela Jazz from South Africa recorded between 1960-1965.

Official date of release; October 31st 2014

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180 grams vinyl LP -Catalog nr. UP 2014.006LP

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 CD -Catalog nr. UP 2014.006CD

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Soul Safari started as a blog to showcase the music of Africa with a strong emphasis on South Africa. Now in its 6th year, Soul Safari is proud to present the third volume of the compilation ‘Township Jive & Kwela Jazz’, a collection of rare gems originally released as shellac 78’s in the period 1960-1965 in South Africa.

On this third volume the selection features the gorgeous close harmony vocal groups singing in the tradition of American R & B and doo wop. But always with that typical South African swing and sung in the Zulu or Xhosa languages. DJ Eddy de Clercq who initiated this compilation in close collaboration with ILAM, also selected a few tunes that stand for the transition from early jive to mbanqaga, a most democratic vocal style characterized by the typical ‘groaning’, a form of call and answer between the male leader (groaner) and female singers. Mbanqaga would follow up jive as the popular vocal music from 1965 onwards.
Kwela jazz knew many variations in which the original instrument, the penny whistle was traded in for accordion, violin, even a melodica, an instrument that also became widely popular in Jamaica. Similarities with uptempo ska can be heard in tunes by Kid Ma Wrong Wrong and Bra Sello featured on this compilation. Again an exciting selection of rare recordings from the heyday of South African Jive & Kwela. Truly music treasures from a long gone past.

All recordings were prepared and mastered from the original 78rpm shellac discs from the ILAM archives. The goal was to clear the dust and dirt of ages gone by, while preserving the original dynamics of the recordings and to keep the sound as little altered as possible.

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 iTunes downloads

Soul Safari presents Township Jive & Kwela Jazz (1960-1965)-Volume 3

Side A

01.    Ngibosen Twist -Telegram Specials   (1965)   02:20

02.    Izwe Liyasha – The Young Stars (1965)        02:48

03.    Ulowa – The Young Stars   (1965)                 02:29

04.    Intogeymy  -The Lower Buttons  (1964)       02:23

05.    Nylon -The Lower Buttons (1964)                 02:53

06.    Kudala Ngizula -Cowboy Superman & His Cowboy Sisters  (1960)        02:15

07.    Manka Binde -Que Sisters (1962)                02:46

08     Nice Time -Que Sisters      (1962)                02:41

Side B

01. Mangothobane -Flying Jazz Queens (1965)                 02:17

02.  Wamuhle Lomfana -Flying Jazz Queens     (1965)       02:26

03.   Unjak’ Upelile -Izintombi Zesi Manje Manje          (1965)        02:2

04.  Five Two Six -Kid Ma Wrong Wrong (1965)                 02:22

05.  Gumba Gumba 800-Kid Ma Wrong Wrong (1965) 02:22

06.   Seven Stitches -Kid Ma Wrong Wrong (1965)                 02:23

07.  Rock Phata 1001-Kid Ma Wrong Wrong with the SDV Swing Band (1965)    02:39

08.  Lulu Part 4 –Bra Sello (1960) 02:24

 

This compilation ℗ + © 2014 Ubuntu Publishing. All rights reserved

 Marketed by Ubuntu Publishing. Distributed by Rush Hour-Amsterdam, Nieuwe Zijdsvoorburgwal 130 B, 1012ST Amsterdam, The Netherlands

distribution@rushhour.nl

Check out our other releases

Township Jive & Kwela Jazz Volume 1(1940-1960)

Soul Safari Township Jive Kwela Jazz 24 juni 11

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 Township Jive & Kwela Jazz Volume 2

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cowboy superman & his cowboy sisters -label kudala ngizula

Soul Safari presents Township Jive & Kwela Jazz Volume 2 (1930-1962) sneak preview

Words can not describe the sensation of compiling yet another collection of jive and kwela jazz shellac 78’s that were found in the ILAM archives in Grahamstown, South Africa.

Most “African” recordings from the fifties and sixties in South Africa were issued on 78 shellac discs and only compiled to LP for the “overseas/white” market in very limited quantities. So one can imagine how rare these records actually are.

The selection of Volume 2 of ‘Township Jive & Kwela Jazz’ features 18 songs that were recorded between 1930 to 1962. Most of these were no big hits, only The Skylarks with Miriam Makeba and The Batchelors featuring Thoko Tomo are the better known names on this compilation.

The latter knew some local success with their Zulu translation of an American Doo Wop original; ‘Book Of Love’ by The Monotones, a one-hit wonder, as their only hit single peaked at #5 on the Billboard Top 100 in 1958.  ‘Sesik’Inyembezi’ was also released as an ep on New Sound XEP 7025 where the two tracks of the original single by The Bachelors comprise the B side. The A side is by The Skylarks with Miriam Makeba. Interestingly the front of the ep sleeve features a photograph of and mentions only The Skylarks with Miriam Makeba – suggests that The Bachelors were very much the lesser act in sales potential.

All recordings were prepared and mastered from the original 78 rpm shellac discs as found in the archives at ILAM. The goal was to clear the dust and dirt of decades gone by, while preserving the original dynamics and to keep the sound as little altered as possible.

Here is a sneak preview of some of the selections that can be found on ‘Township Jive & Kwela Jazz Volume 2”. Full tracklist + mp3 review to be revealed in my next post. Do check it out!

kudos to Alex. Sinclair for sharing his knowledge 

Dorothy Masuka -60 years and counting

dorothy masuka 60
Dorothy Masuka celebrating 60 years in biz

  after 60 years in showbiz, music veteran Dorothy Masuka still has no plans to retire. For the singer retirement doesn’t exist in her vocabulary, music is in her soul.

She explains; “I’ve always respected my profession as well as myself as an African woman. When I was younger the world was a different place. Music was like great wine -the more mature, the better. These days, with technology and media, things happen faster for the youngsters. I am glad I have crafted a legacy for the young generation that will be left behind when I pass on,” she says laughing.

 “Young people must keep on singing indigenous African music because that’s what the world is looking for. And they must keep on composing beautiful new tunes.”

Dorothy Masuka -Ngi Hamba Ngedwa

see also South African Soul Divas pt 2 Dorothy Masuka, Mahotella Queens, Irene & The Sweet Melodians

dorothy+masuka+¬タモ+the+ultimate+collection

To celebrate her musical output during her long career Gallo Records just released Dorothy Masuka’s ‘Ultimate Collection’ on CD/DVD. 

Label: GRC – Product code: CDGMP 41062. Available from May 2013

 Dorothy Masuka – ‘Ultimate Collection’ 

Disc 1

1. Hamba Nontsokolo
2. Umakhumalo
3. Into Yam
4. Lendaba
5. Suka Lapha
6. Handsome Guy
7. Khanyange
8. Impi
9. Magumede
10. Hapo Zamani
11. Somandla
12. Nginje
13. Kulala
14. Igoli
15. Kwamamazala
16. Mamela
17. Bari
18. Sofa Silahlale

Disc 2

1. Hapo Zamani
2. Kulala
3. Umakhumalo
4. Magumede
5. Mamela
6. Khanyange
7. Ei Yow
8. Suka Lapha
9. Lendaba
10. Into Yam
11. Yombela Yombela
12. Sofa Silahlale
13. Lokhuza
14. Mandela
15. Khawuleza
16. Nontsokolo

source; Sowethan + ‘Mama Dorothy’ by Richard Galler, Sawubona travel magazine South African Airlines May 2013

on the Jazz Train with Dolly Rathebe

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See also previous posts

 South African Soul Divas pt 3 Dolly Rathebe,MabelMafuya,NancyJacobs,EvaMadison

African Jazz & Variety -AlfredHerbert1952

Dolly Rathebe -Thlapi Ke Noga

following  Dolly Rathebe’s film career,her fame as a singer increased. Before there was Miriam Makeba, Dolly was the lead singer of the Manhattan Brothers and she recorded her first tunes with them.

She says: “It was a hectic time because I also worked with the Harlem Swingsters and toured with the African Jazz and Variety Show.”

 At that time, Dolly was under contract with Alfred Herbert, a creative organiser who arranged many concerts and who was a driving force behind the popularization of South African jazz. It was Herbert from whom Dolly Rathebe learned the tricks of the trade. She became the star of the show because of her silky singing and good looks. Her legs were considered so beautiful that a metaphor was coined for them. ‘It’s dolly’ meant ‘it’s wonderful’ and was an abbreviation of the Afrikaans ‘s’Dolly se boude’ (it’s Dolly’s tights).

Dolly Rathebe -Ke Ya Kae Le Bona

Drum cover July 1955 photo Bob Gosani

At the start of the 50’s, Herbert had an extensive series of jazz concerts arranged as the African Jazz Parade, a series of numerous performances and concerts, ending years later in Kenya as the African Jazz and Variety Show. During this period that show became somewhat of an institution inSouth Africa. The theatres of Johannesburg were sold out and the show went on tour around other main cities of South Africa and across the African continent.
The musicians all travelled by train and formed bonds and friendships during those long tours away from home. Inspired by the successful Jazz Train in the United States, a special tour to Durban was  organized. The most important musicians of the South African jazz scene from that era were onboard this train.   On a Wednesday morning in June 1955 the Jazz Train left Johannesburg, full of fans, musicians and groupies, on their way  to Durban.

  • Dolly Rathebe posing for an ad for Max cigarettes in 1951.

Photographer Jurgen Schadeberg. “I took this photo in theWerner studios in Johannesburg to promote a cigarette brand. It was one of the first images of black people who were used for commercial advertising.”

  • Dolly Rathebe on the beach 1952. Photographer Jurgen Schadeberg.

 Excerpt and photographs from the book

‘Familieverhalen uit Zuid Afrika, een groepsportret’ by Paul Faber

KIT Publishers, Amsterdam and Kwela Books Cape Town 2002.

The Bachelors with Thoko Tomo – Zulu Jive & Isicathamiya

just unearthed this beautiful single with one side sung in the Doo Wop Jive style and a surprising b-side. The Bachelors and Thoko Tomo is a South African vocal group unknown to me, maybe a reader can shine a light on their origins? The label mentions Jive and as far as I can find out this must be Zulu Jive while the b-side is sung in English.

Gibson Kente wrote the song ‘I Got Troubles’. His name appears on the credits for two other productions,’Ekoneni’ and ‘Inkomo Zodwa’,  recorded by The Skylarks with Makeba & Spokes Mashiyane. See also my previous post Soul Safari presents Township Jive & Kwela Jazz (1940-1960)

‘I Got Troubles’ reminds me of Isicathamiya by the likes of Ladysmith Black Mambazo, even American Gospel. Such heavenly voices! This single was probably released in the early 1960’s following an earlier release as shellac 78 rpm. This was normal practice in the days when the 45 single format replaced the old breakable 78’s. The label New Sound is a subsidiary of Gallo Records, hence the image of the cock in the logo.

The Bachelors -I Got Troubles