Happy New Year 2018! Cape Comic Songs

 

Happy New Year 2018! And what better way to celebrate the New Year with some classic Cape Comic Songs of The Cape Town Street Parade then and now…

Gabriel Bayman croaks Cape comic songs

Backed by Ballie & his Bolle

RCA 32-248 South Africa

Gabriel Bayman Cape Comic songs cover

Over the years the Coloured people of the Cape Peninsula have developed a musical sound of their own, which is as much part of the Cape’s heritage as it’s sparkling white beaches and autumn-hued vinyeards. Drifting on the evening air the plink-a-plonk of banjos and guitars and almost brazen sound of saxophones pour from labourers cottages on the farms of Constantia or from the warren-like, sprawling slum of District Six; from shanties tucked amid the Port Jackson Willows and sand dunes of the Cape Flats or the neatly terraced fisherman’s cottages of Hout Bay comes the sound of the Cape Carnival Beat.

 

And with the advent of the New Year all the joy and some of the sadness of the people whips though the streets of Cape Town in a kaleidoscope of coloured silks and beaming faces during the Carnival.

The songs which they sing –many of them wreathed in passed history, others reflecting history being made today- and the music which they make are as distinctively part of the Peninsula as the heavy white clouds hanging over Table Mountain –the so-called Table Cloth.

Gabriel Bayman is well known as broadcaster and for his characterisations of the Cape Coloured Folk whom he knows so well.

Though he did occasional stage work, including Waiting for Godot (1959) for the National Theatre Organisation (NTO), The Amorous Prawn (1961) at the Alexander Theatre, The Physicists (1963) for the Langford-Inglis Company, A Flea in Her Ear (1968) for the Johannesburg Repertory Players and Canterbury Tales (musical) (1970-71) at the Civic Theatre in Johannesburg, radio listeners were frequently exposed to his voice, even though they did not always realise that it was him. Amongst the programmes in which he featured were 33 Half Moon Street, written first by Adrian Steed and then by Douglas Laws (1965-66), General Motors on Safari, produced by Michael McCabe (1965-69), Squad Cars, directed by David Gooden (1968-85), Eloquent Silence (1969) produced by Cecil Jubber and The Challenge of Space, with Donald Monat (1969-70).

And Bayman starred in a few locally produced movies as well; “The Cape Town Affair” is his best known, a 1967 glamorized spy film produced by 20th Century Fox at Killarney Film Studios in South Africa.

Commentators describe the film as dull, slow-paced, poorly acted and tedious. The film does, however, paint an interesting picture of life in South Africa under apartheid as seen from the point of view of official government policy. All the leading characters are white and even street scenes contain few non-whites.

He also brought out a number of long-playing records, including Die Stories van Oompie Boetie Baradien, Kindersprokies Oorvertel and Gabriel Bayman Croaks Cape Comic Songs. (FO)

Source; ESAT Gabriel Bayman

 

Gabriel Bayman Cape Comic songs label

The origins of many of the ‘moppies’and ‘goemaliedjies’which you will hear are often obscured by time. In the late 1940’s one of the main hit numbers of the year was the song “Mona Lisa”, which blared from juke-boxes and radios throughout the country. The Coloureds took it to their hearts and developed it into a song along their own particular-and sometimes peculiar lines. Every year the winning troupe of the Carnival sings a particular song on its way back to District Six as it marches along Somerset Road. Invariably it is an adaption of the ‘hit of the year’and in this instance ‘Mona Lisa’ was the song. Naturally the words and even the theme was altered, and it ended up as a bawdry, frivolous street song which caught the enthousiasm of everyone who heard it.

Gabriel Bayman -Mona Lisa

Gabriel Bayman -So Lank As Die Rietjie In Die Water Le

Gabriel Bayman -Beestepote

Gabriel Bayman -Veepoot Kwela 

Gabriel Bayman -Ry Hom Boetie Ry Hom

Gabriel Bayman -Die Sop

 

Perhaps the most delightful of all the lyrics on this record is ‘Ry hom, boetie ry hom….’ A racing song if ever there was one! In the old days, when races were run on the Green  Point Common this is a song that certainly was sung. A lady visitor from Britain wrote in the 1860s  “how curious it is to see one of our elegant English jockeys being beaten to the post by a wizened little Hottentot”. One can only imagine that the ‘wizened little’ jockey concerned was egged on to the winning post with this cry.

For any South African, English or Afrikaans speaking, this record is a real party piece, guaranteed to set feet tapping and partners twirling to the ending, the traditional farewell, “Baiei Terima Kassie”, “Maak Vir Julle Klaar Om Nou Huistoe te Gaan” want Tante Fiena draai, tot die eerste hoender kraai.

Liner notes by Peter Schirmer

See also

songs and dances from Cape Malay fit for a king

Happy New Year 2015 from Cape Town

Best African music finds 2017 #7 -Farafina –Bolomakoté Burkina Faso

farafina-en-tunisieone post a day for the remainder of 2017 featuring a selection of some of my best finds of African music last year…not necessary brand new releases. Mostly vintage original pressings found during my travels all over the world.

#7 Farafina ‎– Bolomakoté

veraBra Records ‎– veraBra No. Germany 1989

 

farafina -bolomakoté cover watermarked

Farafina is a group of percussionists / dancers from Burkina Faso in West Africa, founded orginally by Mahama Konaté.

Excellent workouts on traditional African instruments like the balafon and djembé are recorded on this album, one of the standout tracks of ‘Bolomakoté’ is the track “Moroman Wouele”, an amazing rhythm journey with hypnotic chants! The track starts seductively like a North African belly dance morphing gradually into a faster samba rhythm. The latin theme re-appears even stronger on the B-side….dance-floor friendly album for sure.

Farafina’s ability to expand their music without denying their traditional instruments has enabled them to experience new forms and record with musicians such as Jon Hassell, the Rolling Stones, Ryuichi Sakamato, Daniel Lanois, Billy Cobham, Joji Hirota….

In 1988 Farafina worked together with Jon Hassell on an ambient/experimental album ‘Flash Of The Spirit’. The group played several times at the Montreux Jazz Festival, and stole the show at the famous Nelson Mandela’s birthday concert in the London Wembley Stadium.

farafina -bolomakoté label watermarked

A1 Moroman Wouele 4:22

A2 Bolomakoté Mahama 3:42

A3 Mandela 3:06

A4 Nianiae Lomina 4:54

A5 Kodine 5:08

B1 Samba 4:20

B2 Patron Mousso (Instrumental) 5:40

B3 Goulikanairi Ye 2:53

B4 Kabouroudibi 6:23

 

Farafina_2008_2-500-1

 

Credits

Balafon – Baba Diara, Mahama Konaté

Djembé – Paco Yé Adama

Flute – Soungalo Coulibaly

Lead Vocals – Mahama Konaté, Paco Yé Adama, Soungalo Coulibaly

Maracas – Souleyname Sanou, Soungalo Coulibaly

Percussion [Bara] – Beh Palm, Baba Ouatara

Percussion [Doudoum’ba] – Baba Diara

Percussion [Doudoum’ni] – Souleyname Sanou, Tiawara Keita

Talking Drum – Tiawara Keita

REFORM SOUND SYSTEM 2 DEC 17 JHB

reform 2 dec 2017

6 decades of soul, rare groove, springbok radiohits, township jive & kwela jazz, northern soul, girl groups, vintage disco, indie, funk, hip hop, nigeria 70s, dancehall and other rarities heard nowhere else….

Saturday 2nd December 2017 from 2pm-12 am

dj’s Charles Leonard, Marc Latilla, Eddy De Clercq (Soul Safari, Amsterdam), Mxolisi Makhubo, dj Jun (aka Ninja 45, Japan)

Eclectic laid-back afternoon session & dancing under the Johannesburg Skyline Sunset

The Troyeville Hotel
1403 Albertina Sisulu Road (corner Wilhelmina)
Johannesburg

entrance; 50 Rand

reform 2 dec 2017

Guitarist Ray Phiri R.I.P. (1947-2017)

ray phiri

Ray Phiri (born 23 March 1947, Hermansberg, near Nelspruit, South Africa – died 12 July 2017, Nelspruit, South Africa), whose guitar work reached a worldwide audience through his distinctive contributions to Paul Simon‘s hit Graceland and Rhythm of the Saints LPs, has died at the age of 70.

The BBC brings word of Phiri’s death, which took place at a clinic in the South African city of Nelspruit two months after he was diagnosed with lung cancer. He’d been hospitalized for several weeks, during which time he was the unwilling focus of a crowdfunding campaign to help defray his medical costs; according to an interview excerpted in the BBC’s report, he asked fans to let him “suffer [in peace with my] pain, on my own with my dignity.”

Phiri’s last public request reflects his lifelong approach to dealing with tragedy and misfortune. Among South Africa’s most widely respected musicians, he rose to prominence with his group Stimela (“train” in the Nguni language), a pioneering fusion band whose blend of smooth jazz with the Afropop mbaqanga sound proved popular — although not with the South African government in the apartheid era, during which Stimela’s records were occasionally banned and the state reportedly even tried spying on the group.

International stardom for Phiri proved somewhat fleeting — although his beautiful tone is instantly recognizable to anyone who listened to Simon’s music during the Graceland and Rhythm of the Saintsera, his tenure in Simon’s band was fairly brief given the massive success those albums enjoyed, and in later years, he alleged that he’d never been fairly credited or compensated for his work. Speaking with the Sunday Times, he spoke of his feud with Simon, but concluded — as he so often did — on an optimistic note.

“There’s bad blood with Paul Simon,” said Phiri. “He never gave me credit on the album for the songs I wrote, and financially we hardly got any royalties. But maybe I wouldn’t have been able to handle all that wealth. I sleep at night, I have my sanity and I enjoy living. The big rock ‘n’ roll machine did not munch me.”

In more recent years, Phiri continued to deal with personal struggles, including the death of his third wife in a 2014 car crash, yet he saw his musical legacy continue to grow — particularly at home, where the fall of South Africa’s racist apartheid regime opened an era in which his talents were not only acknowledged but valued by the state. In the wake of his passing, the African National Congress issued a statement praising Phiri’s inestimable contributions to the national culture.

“Ray Phiri was a voice for the voiceless and a legend of our time,” it reads. “An immensely gifted composer, vocalist and guitarist, he breathed consciousness and agitated thoughts of freedom through his music … He has played his role in unearthing and support new talent in the industry and has been an ardent and vocal advocate of the call for greater investment in local content development and the development of the industry as a whole.”

See also

Discovery of the Week -Thoughts Visions and Dreams -Ray Phiri

Stimela -Look, Listen And Decide 1986

banned records from South Africa

 

GETATCHEW MEKURIA PASSED AWAY TODAY

Getatchew Mekuria (photo Matias Corral)
Getatchew Mekuria (photo Matias Corral)

 

GETATCHEW MEKURIA PASSED AWAY TODAY

MARCH 14, 1935 – APRIL 4, 2016
 
Getatchew passed away today. At the age of 81 and after a musical career of 68 years. He was a truely unique saxophone player. Born in the countryside of Ethiopia, he heard the saxophone on the radio at the age of 13 and went to Addis Abeba straight away. He wanted to play saxophone! And soon after that he got himself into the Municipality Band. Later he played in the Haile Selassie Orchestra’s, the National Theatre Orchestra and more.

Since 2004 he played regularly with The Ex. It was his choice after hearing us at one of our festivals. He recognized something in our music which reminded him of the early groups he was in, like the Fetan Band (Speed Band). He loved playing with us and for us it was also an incredible experience. He was always totally himself, full-on intense and dedicated. We played more than 100 concerts and made two beautiful albums together.

The last few years, his health was not very good. He couldn’t really go on tour anymore. As a kind of farewell concert for his fans, we organized a big event in the National Theatre in Addis Abeba. He got lots of attention and respect that night: 1500 people in the audience, three TV stations and a legendary concert. Getatchew was playing while sitting on a chair, but his playing was stronger than ever.

His whole life was devoted to music. With his unique sound and approach he leaves behind an eternal inspiration!

We will miss him.
 
The Ex.

Black Power -the New Black Dandyism

 

sizzling hot couture voorpagina sunday times 7 feb 16

Hello World. Today’s post is a longread so may I suggest to take your time.

At the start of February the SA Menswear Fall 2016 Week took place in Cape Town, as in other capitals of the world. After Paris, Milan and London, the African continent sets its mark on international fashion. Fashion is flourishing as never before in Africa, a legion of ambitious young fashion designers are evolving towards national and international recognition and showing their collections to local and foreign buyers and press. The first rows are complemented by an enthusiastic young audience of bloggers and fashionistas eager to see the latest fashion.

sizzling hot couture voorpagina sunday times 7 feb 16 -detail
model Sanele Xaba

And the amazing thing is that this actually sells. A new black middle-class has the money and interest to actually buy the clothes of African designers. Design boutiques and ultra-luxurious shopping centres offer a shopping extravanga never seen before and are popping up around the big South African cities. Should you be looking for a 40’s Christian Dior jacket, a Balenciaga ballgown from the 50’s, or Jordache bellbottoms, then your retro fix will be satisfied at The Flea Market at the Market Theatre in Newtown, the cultural hub of Johannesburg.

But it’s more than just expensive designer clothes or original vintage haute couture. Fashion is hot not only for style-concious hipsters but is regarded as a highly effective way to create an own identity. It is also a firm confirmation that one who dresses well has style. And the young ‘bornfrees’-the generation that was born after 1991-have style, radiate confidence and success. Besides that, African traditions and the heritage of the ancestors are en vogue.

That is reflected in the book The Black Photo Album / Look at Me: 1890-1950 by Santu Mofokeng  (Published by Steidl in 2013. ISBN 978-3869303109)

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For this book Santu Mofokeng collected private photographs which urban black working and middle-class families in South Africa commissioned between 1890 and 1950, a time when the government was creating policies towards those designated as “natives”. Painterly in style, the images evoke the artifices of Victorian photography. Some of them are fiction, a creation of the artist in terms of setting, props, clothing and pose – yet there is no evidence of coercion. We believe these images, as they reveal something about how these people imagined themselves. In this work Mofokeng analyses the sensibilities, aspirations and self-image of the black population and its desire for representation and social recognition in times of colonial rule and suppression. The Black Photo Album / Look at Me: 1890-1950 is drawn from an ongoing research project of the University of Witwatersrand in Johannesburg.

DREAM BIG, ACT COOL

Every year The Street Cred Festival brings a buzz to Johannesburg, an excitement in street-culture that unites the hottest and cool young fashionistas and designers. Streetgangs like the Swenkas, Smarties (Soweto), Isokothan (a gang modeled after the Urhobo People of Niger Delta) show that their passion for fashion is not only obsessive by clothes but at the same time their style manifests a passive aggressive form of resistance.

Although financially limited this young generation wants to create their own look, to show the world an interpretation of Africa, a tribute to their ancestors while looking forward to the future. It is hopeful and positive. What is Africa, Who am I as an African, those are the big questions that engage this new generation. Bloggers  like Sartist reflect the search for a new horizon of fashion and dopeness.

THE SARTIST
Sartist

LES SAPEURS & NYC GANGSTA STYLE

Each new movement has obviously predecessors. Les Sapeurs became somewhat of a household name in Congo in the 60’s with their brash dandyism. In New York it was designer Dapper Dan of Harlem who created the flamboyant look and style of rappers like LL Cool J and other heroes of the early hip hop scene in early 80’s.

dapper dan interview magazine 1
Dapper Dan of Harlem

Right on 125th street in Harlem USA, sat a custom high-end clothing boutique owned by Mr. Dapper Dan. Before Kanye, Juelz, Fabolous and some other well known rappers wore Gucci and Louis Vutton, Dapper Dan in the 80’s and 90’s planted the seed for fashion in the hip hop culture. He created one of a kind customized high-end clothing that incorporated highly recognizable accessory logos like those of Gucci and Louis Vuitton, featuring them in non-traditional ways. His pieces were sold for thousands of dollars, and created a sense of what’s cool, what’s new in the streets and ‘in hip-hop’.

The designer describes his way of working as ‘sampling’, an unique interpretation of mixing existing designs and logos with his own interpretation. Dan Dapper ” I opened my workshop in ’82. First I would take little garment bags by Louis Vuitton and Gucci and cut them up, but that wouldn’t suffice for complete garments. So I said, “I have to figure out how to print this on fabric and leather.” I went through trial and error. I didn’t even know we were messing with dangerous chemicals—the U.S. government eventually outlawed the chemicals I was using. We made these huge silk screens so I could do a whole garment. A Jewish friend of mine helped me science out the secret behind the ink, and that was it.”

Diane Dixon coat by Dapper Dan
the Diane Dixon coat
dapper dan alpo coat
the Aldo coat

 

His designs specified the look of hip-hop artists, sporters and those incurred by gangsters. “Gangsters. That’s who I grew up with. Middle-class blacks couldn’t accept what I was doing—you had to be of a revolutionary spirit. Who would be more like that than gangsters? And who would have the money? Hip-hop artists didn’t have any money. They used to wait until the gangsters left the store before they could come in and ask what the gangsters wore. Everybody follows the gangsters. The athletes came before the hip-hop artists. Mark Jackson, Walter Berry. I’ve got pictures of NBA players that I can’t even remember their names. The athletes had money earlier that the hip-hop artists.

FAVORITE CREATION: The “Alpo Coat” [for drug dealer Alberto Martinez] and the Diane Dixon coat [for Olympic athlete Diane Dixon].

source; The Guardian

see also les Sapeurs; battle of the dandies

AFRICAN DESIGNERS LIGHT UP THE CATWALK

Ozwald Boateng is a London fashion designer of Ghanaian descent and co-founder of Made in Africa Foundation, which supports and funds studies for large-scale infrastructure projects across Africa.

Boateng is known for his classic British menswear, done in warm colors. He is considered one of the most successful designers of men’s fashion in recent years. His big break came in 2005 when he worked as designer for the French fashion house Givenchy and dressed actor Jamie Foxx for the Oscars.

His first show in Ghana caused a small revolution. Just like in 2013 during NYC Fashion Week where Boateng showed mainly African prints processed in classic men’s suits on black models. Boateng’s explains his vision on style; “Colonialism has done little good for Africa but it brought the typical Western sense of style and elegance to Africa. Mixed with local traditions this sensibility created a truely new African identity.”

ozwald boateng 2013
Ozwald Boateng 2013 NYC Fashion Week

During the same week in NYC South African born designer Gavin Rajah brought the fantasy element of fashion back to the runway with creations that were eclectic and high glamour. Again, black models ruled the catwalk.

DO NOT MAKE WHAT IS THERE, MAKE WHAT IS NOT THERE

Is the motto of label ACF (Art Comes First/Always Cut First). ACF is an exciting innovative concept that typifies the New Black Dandyism.

In their vision a modern day gentleman stands for Energy, Style, Power and Pride.

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With a collection they call “Dance”, Sam Lambert & Shaka Maidoh of the ACF now launch Avec ces Freres. Avec ces Freres inaugural range sees the duo manifest the authentic spirit of the ACF within a focused assortment of interrelated styles. The essential root of the ACF’s style fraternity is their shared vision of the modern gentlemen in a new age. Elemental to this notion is a zealous commitment to travel and the belief that a near constant state of travel leads to a near constant state of learning. Travel is a journey of discovery. Discovery is the porthole to knowledge. -And the sensation experienced during moments of true discovery and the acquisition of knowledge is equal parts cerebral, physical and spiritual. Discovery delivers “little hits of wonder”, it injects a lasting spring in our step and it makes us want to smile and smile, to jump and jump, to dance and dance.

Lambert and Maidoh have worked to vitalize this simple notion in a fresh travel-friendly wardrobe crafted with intelligence, curiosity and good intention.

From the press release of their Autumn/Winter 15 Lookbook

BLACK POWER

Dark Models dominate World’s Fashion Weeks catwalks…

There are 50 shades of grey, and perhaps even more shades of black. And the blacker the better as South African designers scramble for darker-hued models who are regarded as ‘edgy and classy’. About half the models at the South African Menswear Autumn/Winter 2016 in Cape Town were very dark. They walked for designers including Craig Jacobs, Julia M’Poko of Mo’Ko Elosa and Jenevieve Lyons.

Popular on local runways is Jimi Ogunlaja, a Nigerian-born model and the face of 46664 Apparel, who has been walking ramps in South Africa for brands including Fabiani, Carducci and Craig Port since 2008.

Source; The Sunday Times 7th February 2016

jimi
Jimi Ogunlaja

 

 

jimi-3
model Jimi Oganlaja

 

Sanele Xaba
model Sanele Xaba
Max_Mara_Spring_2012_Backstage_Rtfe_Chi_Bu_HVx
model Akuol De Mabior

couverture-dazed-and-confused

 

During the Paris Fashion 2016 Week black models also graced the Balmain Fall 2016 Ready to Wear catwalk, although the look and wide choice of models was based on the now platinum Kim Kardashian West. Her husband Kanye was sitting front row. His fashion-show-slash-record-listening-slash-party in New York last month drew 20,000 New Yorkers into Madison Square Garden on a freezing Thursday afternoon. The premiere of Yeezy Season 3 and stream of his new album, The Life of Pablo, proved to be the event of the New York Fashion 2016 week—with people lining up hours beforehand to enter. Young, old, invited or not, Kanye fans patiently waited for the doors to open. And once they did it was madness. The power of commercial streetstyle!

Inside Kanye West’s Yeezy Season 3 Extravaganza

Kanye West -The Life of Pablo pop-up shop

Lupita Nyong’o in Balmain
Lupita Nyong’O wearing Balmain

Lupita Nyong’o

 

Lupita Nyong'o on the cover of Ms. 2016
Lupita Nyong’o on the cover of Ms. 2016
Lupita Nyong'o
Lupita Nyong’o

Lupita Nyong’o, one of the hottest black actresses of the moment walked onstage of the Late Night With Seth Meyers-talkshow in a tomato red Balmain power suit. Lupita Nyong’o is a Kenyan actress and film director. She made her American film debut in 2013 in Steve McQueen’s historical drama 12 Years a Slave. She won an Oscar for her supporting role as Patsey. But movie stars, popstars or fashion designers with African roots are not the only forces to dominate fashion in 2016, the biggest influence remains the First Lady of the USA, Michelle Obama.

Michelle Obama
US First Lady Michelle Obama 2016

See details of the South African Fashion Week

Spring / Summer ’16 Collections

5 – 9 April 2016

http://www.safashionweek.co.za

diggin’ in NYC -update October 2015

things move fast in NYC. Faster than a devoted collector can handle sometimes. On my last safari in NYC I noticed that an update to  diggin’ in NYC -top 5 record shops-is necessary. Quite a walk!

 academy records 1

New location checked 12th October 2015

 

Academy Records Annex

85 Oak Street, Brooklyn, NY 11222

0718-218-8200

USA

A year ago my favourite recordshop re-located to Oak Street, a few blocks more up north. It’s quite a walk from the subway but the scenics of the river and the skyline of Manhattan on a clear sunny day are just mindblowing.

Change trains at Union Square Station for L Train, stop Bedford Avenue. Leave the subway, cross the street and go down to Berry Street, then continue along the waterfront.  Long walk but soothing after the huzz&buzz of Manhattan, quite unreal. It felt like stepping out in a different world onto a movie set.

academy records 2
academy records annex

The new Academy Annex is airy with high ceilings, nice wide spacing of bins, even a few listening posts. Second hand vinyl galore here…although not as huge in stock as in bygone days. The shop remains a well recommended address in NYC with daily fresh supply at reasonable prices. I dug the broad selection of vinyl in every genre.Rare vintage records abundant on display on the walls. A limited supply of new produced vinyl in the rock genre is available. The extra attraction are the ‘dollarbins’; -3 for $ 5 second hand vinyl. Many DJs search for house 12” and disco classics here.

 

rough trade NYC
rough trade NYC

Rough Trade NYC

64 North 9th Street, Brooklyn, NY 11249

0718-388-4111

USA

 

Housed in a big old warehouse along the quays of the East River a new branch of the famed UK record label Rough Trade opened within walking distance of Academy Annex.  A big record shop on the main floor, and a concert hall as extra attraction. British indie bands and a wide variety of American artists find a shelter here at night. See the signs on the walls for a daily calendar.

The shop is huge and looks like a cocoon of hi- polished metal stands filled with the latest import and 180 grams vinyl reissues !! An exemplary stocked selection of all brand new published vinyl in all genres. Rough Trade rules the bins here for sure but what a highly surprising  selection of music can be found. There is even one tiny square meter of selected vintage vinyl, for serious cratediggers only.