The definitive remastered edition of Miriam Makeba’s ‘Pata Pata’

Strut Records presents the definitive remastered edition of Miriam Makeba’s
‘Pata Pata’ for the latest instalment of Strut’s Original Masters album reissue
series.

The all-time classic of South African music, and international breakthrough for
Makeba, has been mastered by The Carvery from the original reel to reel tapes,available in its mono and stereo versions for the first time. Living in exile
in the US after the anti-apartheid film ‘Come Back, Africa’ gained international
attention, she quickly built her career in New York during the ‘60s, mentored by 
Harry Belafonte

After a period with RCA, she revisited to one of her older hits ‘Pata Pata’ with early vocal harmony group The Skylarks. Rerecording this time with producer Jerry Ragovoy, the new version brought a lighter uptempo R’nB arrangement, adding some English lyrics. “It was my first truly big seller,” Makeba recalled “In the discotheques, they invented a new dance called the ‘Pata Pata’ where couples dance apart and then reach out and touch each other. I went to Argentina for a concert, and across South America, they are singing my song.” 

Other songs on the album include a version of the traditional Xhosa classic, ‘Click Song Number One’ (‘Qongqothwane’), the atmospheric ‘West Wind’, later famously covered by her friend Nina Simone, and a version of Tilahun Gessesse’s ‘Yetentu Tizaleny’ which Makeba learned on a trip to Addis to perform for Haile Selassie at the Organisation Of African Unity. 

Physical formats also feature brand new sleeve notes alongside rare photos from the time of recording and session details. 

‘Pata Pata’ is released on 6th September on 2LP, 1CD, streaming and digital.

see also

South African Soul Divas pt 1-Miriam Makeba

South African Soul Divas Pt 4 -The Skylarks

Brokers show on The Word Belgian Radio -guest dj Soul Safari

LISTEN….I was invited as guest dj for the 2nd hour of the program BROKERS on Belgian radio station The Word. These nice guys gave me carte blanche for a selection of personal favorite tunes….thanks Oswald Moris for the great introduction and your seamless selection of timeless disco/boogie/electro tunes. LOVE!!

All records in the 2nd hour of the BROKERS show from my own collection, vinyl only!! Listen to this mix filled with ultra rare South-African, Nigerian, Liberian & Brazilian grooves. Some really funky Disco rarities too. And to top it off the 2nd hour closes with a previously unreleased remix of one of my own productions; ‘Changes’ with Sylvia Kristel (RIP), a mellow sexy funky mix by Zuco 102. Yes, that is the Brazilian band Zuco103 minus 1. This remix is yet to be released. All vinyl, all good! Make sure to check my blog on Africa, ‘Soul Safari’: https://soulsafari.wordpress.com/

tracklist 2nd Hour The Word Brokers -EDDY DE CLERCQ

The Drive – Iphi Intombi Yam pts 1 + 2
The Jazz Clan – Oh Happy Day
Salah Ragab – Egypt Strut
Kindred Spirit & Corina Flamma Sherman – Inner Languages
Kindred Spirit & Corina Flamma Sherman – Put Your Spirit Up
Luisito Quintero feat. Francis Mbappe – Gbagada, Gbagada, Gbogodo, Gbogodo (Roots Mute Mix)
Ray Munnings – Funky Nassau
Freddi Hench & The Soulsetters – I Like Funky Music
Chocolate Milk – Who’s Getting It Now
Tom Scott and the L.A. Express – Jump Back
Jackie Moore – Heart Be Still
Patti & The Emblems – It’s The Little Things
Patrick Moraz – Rana Batucada
EDC & Friends feat. Sylvia Kristel – Changes (Zuco 102 Mix)

Listen here to the full 2 hours Brokers show with the first hour by resident dj Oswald Moris, followed by my own mix of ultra rare South-African, Nigerian, Liberian & Brazilian grooves. Some really funky Disco rarities too….enjoy!

Legendary singer Dorothy Masuka dies at 83

Dorothy Masuka at 60

Dorothy Masuka was one of the great South African jazz singers of the 1950s. Together with Dolly Rathebe and Miriam Makeba she became an iconic singer and writer of memorable tunes like Pata Pata, Kwawuleza and Into Yam. Many of her songs were recorded by artists like Makeba.

“ Her music was the soundtrack of some our most joyful moments, the light of or souls during our darkest hours” said Nathi Mthethwa, South Africa’s Arts & Culture minister following her death.

Masuka had been suffering from complications related to hypertension, after having a mild stroke in 2018. One of her last stage performances was at Winnie Mandela’s funeral in that same year.

Go Go Suffering

Dorothy Masuka was born in 1935 in Bulawayo, Zimbabwe. Her parents migrated to South Africa when she was 12 years old. Despite her parents’ disapproval, Masuka dropped out of school at 16 to pursue her dream of becoming a professional singer.

She signed a deal to record with Troubadour Records and after a spell with the African Ink Spots she left for Zimbabwe to join The Golden Rhythm Crooners. But she was soon on her way back to Johannesburg and in the train she penned ‘Hamba Hamba Nontsokolo’ loosely translated as ‘go, go suffering’.

The song became her biggest hit and one of the most popular songs of the 1950s. It is regarded as an African classic and remains her signature tune to this day. By 1953, when she was 18, Masuka was already a fully fledged professional musician and, along with Makeba and Hugh Masekela, she toured with Alf Herbert’s African Jazz & Variety Show and with the musical King Kong.

She also performed with the Harlem Swingsters in the mid-1950s and endeared herself to a wide audience with her provocative compositions that riled the apartheid regime. In 1961, the Special Branch seized the master recordings of her composition ‘Lumumba’ which paid tribute to Patrice Lumumba, the first prime minister of the Congo. She also dared to write a political song about the then Prime Minister Dr Malan and was exiled for over 30 years. In Malawi, Tanzania, Zambia and the UK Masuka campaigned for the liberation of SA through her music.

After many years working as a flight attendant for Zambian Airways, she returned to South Africa at the beginning of the 1990’s. A few years later she was a recipient of the Order of Ikhamanga Silver from the SA government. Dorothy Masuka was also inducted into the Hall of Fame in the US in 2002.

source; The Sowetan/The Herald -Kyle Zeeman

see also

Dorothy Masuka -60 years and counting

South African Soul Divas pt 2 Dorothy Masuka, Mahotella Queens, Irene & The Sweet Melodians

South African Soul Divas pt 3 Dolly Rathebe, Mabel Mafuya, Nancy Jacobs, Eva Madison

African Jazz & Variety -Alfred Herbert 1952

Bongi Makeba

Bongi Makeba (20 December 1950 – 1985) was a South African singer/songwriter. She was the only child of singer Miriam Makeba with her first husband, James Kubay.

Makeba was born in South Africa. She recorded only one solo album, ‘Blow On Wind’ (pläne-records) before she died after a traumatic miscarriage in 1985. She was buried in Conakry, Guinea. Some of her songs could be heard years later in her mother’s repertoire. See and hear mother and daughter together on stage at the North Sea Jazz Festival 1980.

Bongi Makeba ‎– Blow On Wind (pläne ‎– 88234) released in 1980 -her only solo album produced in Germany by Conny Plank.

Bongi Makeba -Sikhumbula (Liberation)

Bongi Makeba -Kilimanjaro

Miriam Makeba left South Africa in 1959, after landing a lead role in the jazz musical King Kong, a tragic story about a boxer, Ezekiel “King Kong” Dlamini. After moving to the US, Bongi started a singing career with Judy White, the daughter of blues singer Josh White. The duo released a few singles in 1967 on American labels under the name Bongi & Judy. Although written and produced by some of the then big names, Bert Keyes and Ashford & Simpson, both singles did not stir up big waves.

 

With her American husband, Nelson Lee, she made two 7″ records
in the early to mid-1970s that were more successful. “Bongi and Nelson” features two soul tracks arranged by George Butcher: “That’s the Kind of Love” and “I Was So Glad” (France: Syliphone SYL 533) & “Everything For My Love” and “Do You Remember Malcom ” (France: Syliphone SYL 532).

see also my previous posts on Miriam Makeba 

African Jazz & Variety -Alfred Herbert 1952

South African Soul Divas pt 1-Miriam Makeba

King Kong, the first All African Jazz Opera 1956

South African Soul Divas Pt 4 -The Skylarks

Soul Safari Radio -Soul Beat -podcast Nr 1 -11th August 2018

soul safari radio podcast 1 gecomp

hi World…here is a new initiative from Soul Safari. A podcast to highlight and celebrate some great unknown South African music!

For this very first show I selected 12 really cool and rare 45 singles by the best of South African Soul Jazz groups, all records from my own collection.  Different styles ranging from vocal to instrumental tunes, recorded and released between 1969 to 1982. Seldom heard on any radio-show…but exclusively now for your ears here on Soul Safari as a podcast.  35 minutes of great South African soul jazz.

I do hope you will enjoy this new initiative!

Here is the playlist and pics from all records played….

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Soul Safari Radio –Soul Beat -podcast Nr 1

-11th August 2018

The Pedlars -At The Club

The Family -Hear Say

The Pedlars -Right On

The Mechanics -Why Not?

The Bee Dees -Big Brother

The Movers -I Need Somebody

The Go-Aheads -Go Ahead Pt 1

The Blue Revues -Spook Mahala

The Flaming Souls -Oh Darling!

Ray Jazz Combo -The Golden Step

Soul Giants -Soul Prayer

The Jazz Clan -Oh Happy Day

 

see also

Funk Soul Brothers – part 2-The Flaming Souls ‘Soul Time’ 1969 South Africa

Funk Soul Brothers – part 2-The Flaming Souls ‘Soul Time’ 1969 South Africa


the flaming souls -soul time cover

Already posted in 2013 but still such a real gem that I’d like to share again….a great LP by one of the best groups in soul-jazz style that ruled from mid 60s to mid 70s in South Africa.

Only a few studio-albums and a bunch of rare 7″ singles  are known. In addition to the information found on electricjive I add the lp ‘Soul Time’ by The Flaming Souls as today’s post.  This obscure group definitely deserves a higher ranking in popularity.

The Flaming Souls were produced by Teal record scout West Nkosi and members included Simon Twala, Philip Malela, Gerald Khoza, Herman Fox, Kenny Mosito and Condry Ziqubu. Their sound is based on a slow jam of groovy organ, guitar and funky drums, drifting loosely to the style of American counterparts like Booker T & MG’s with clear references to Newport jazz as well. Hence a title like ‘Newport Soul’ or the remake of ‘Take Five’. But it is  ‘Monks Beat’ that steals the show in this category.

the flaming souls -soul time back

‘Soul Time’ contains a selection of moody instrumentals and grooves that breathe African soul, jazz ala Jimmy Smith or Monk Higgins, even the instrumental organ-based period by James Brown pops up, when he recorded for Mercury/Smash Records.

Different South African indepent labels like Up, Up, Up and Atlantic City have released the group’s recorded output but only locally,which might explain why their records are so unknown and hard to get nowadays. Surprisingly in 1969 , ‘Soul Time’ was released in South Africa on Number One Records, a sub-division of the budget label MFP, Music For Pleasure.  Essential album that I like to share here today.

the flaming souls -soul time label 1

The Flaming Souls -Souly Mama

The Flaming Souls -Soul Again

The Flaming Souls -Monks Beat

The Flaming Souls -Something

the flaming souls -soul time label 2

The Flaming Souls -Take Five

The Flaming Souls -Fox, Monks And Souls

The Flaming Souls -Newport Soul

The Flaming Souls -Tremblin Soul

‘Soul Time’ by The Flaming Souls -Number One Records N.9022 (33YE 1005)-South Africa

see also Funk Soul Brothers -part 1 

Hugh Masekela (1939-2018) South Africa’s godfather of jazz, has died

Hugh Masekela, South African trumpeter, has died after battle with prostate cancer -photo Bra Hugh (AP Photo-Jeff Christensen)
photo Bra Hugh (AP Photo-Jeff Christensen)

Legendary South African trumpeter and anti-apartheid movement figure, Hugh Masekela has died at aged 78, after a battle with prostate cancer, according to his family and the government.

Born on April 4, 1939, Masekela first picked up a trumpet after seeing the film “Young Man With a Horn” and encouraged by activist Father Trevor Huddleston. Often described as the “father of South African jazz”, Masekela was an icon of South Africa’s Sophiatown, the political and cultural enclave of Johannesburg that was razed by apartheid police but remains a symbol of black freedom.

read more 

 ‘Masekela introducing Hedzoleh Soundz’ is probably one of the most impressive excursions of a jazz trumpeter into the deep heartlands of Africa; Hugh Masekela meets Nigerian band Hedzoleh Soundz.

After his big hit success with ‘Grazing in the grass’,  which went to #1 in both the pop and R&B charts in 1968, Masekela joined his former wife Miriam Makeba in Guinea, Africa for a tour. It was there that he met the Ghanian band Hedzoleh Soundz, an extremely talented band known for blending the ancient rhythmic traditions of their native Ghana with American jazz and Latin music.

At the time Fela Kuti was taking Africa and the world by storm with his brand of Nigerian Jazz Funk.  The interlocking rhythms over which his saxophone could endlessly groove were reminiscent of the style of funk patterns that James Brown pioneered in the U.S.

Hedzoleh Soundz combines the rhythmic traditions of their native Ghana while Masekela adds the improvisational drive of jazz. The album ‘Introducing Hedzoleh Soundz’ was recorded in Lagos, Nigeria in 1973 and features such tracks as ‘Languta’, an irresistible chunk of infectious Afro beat with an inspired Masekela singing and blowing on top.

‘Masekela introducing Hedzoleh Soundz’ -Languta

Masekela introducing Hedzoleh Soundz

players:

  • Hugh Masekela – Trumpet & Vocals
  • Stanley Kwesi Todd – Electric Bass & Vocals
  • James Kwaku Morton – Congas & Vocals
  • Nat “Leepuma” Hammond – Congas, Flute & Vocals
  • Richard Neesai “Jagger” Botchway – Guitar
  • Isaac Asante – Talking Drum, Percussion & Vocals
  • Samuel Nortey – Percussion & Vocals
  • Acheampong Welbeck – Drums

tracks;

  1. Languta
  2. Kaa Ye Oya
  3. Adade
  4. Yei Baa Gbe Wolo
  5. Patience
  6. When
  7. Nye Tamo Ame
  8. Rekpete

Blue Thumb Chisa BTS 62 USA

Buy the original album here