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Lost & Found pt 2 -Peanut Butter Conspiracy -South African 70’s Soul & Psych

February 24, 2015

see also Lost & Found pt 1 -Wanda Arletti -Love Power!!

Lost & Found is a series that showcases long lost music from the 60s by South African white artists. Maybe these songs and sounds were lost for years but not forgotten. Today I want to present a record by Peanut Butter Conspiracy aka PBC, a group that worked with The Flames and singer Una Valli. Not to be confused with the American band of 1966 with the same name. A combination of soul and uptempo excitement, just plain talent combined with ambition and gutsy professionalism. No hype, no hustle.

see also The Flames -Soulfire!! South Africa’s soul super group

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peanut butter conspiracy

The group Peanut Butter Conspiracy was formed in 1968. The original line up included: Una Valli (vocals), John Lindeman (guitar),Brian Mulder (bass), Ron Naturam (keyboards), Mike Fox (drums), Peter Lynch (sax/mouth-organ/guitar) and Mike Koch (drums). Subsequent band members included Ton Schiff (keyboards), George Hill (drums), Herbert Simon (guitar), Moose Forer (bass), Frank Hill (drums), Stuart Preston (drums), Mick Spooner (keyboard/sax), Eddie Payne (trumpet) and Freddie Schesser (trumpet). “Understanding”reached #2 on Springbok’s Top 20 in May 1971 and spent 17 weeks on the charts. It went to #1 on the Rhodesian charts for three weeks in May 1971. Other hits include: “Hold On To What You’ve Got” (#4 Aug ’71) and “Amen” (#2 Dec ’71).

Their cover of the song “Part Of Someone (Church)” originally by Steven Stills remains a true gem that is waiting to shine again.

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PBC continued on to at least 1973 releasing a few records on the Columbia record label in South Africa. Alan Brackett of the American band said that he no doubt believes that they used their name especially because both bands were signed with Columbia. There is also a barbershop quartet with the same name.  There were many foreign bands that emulated American sounds with 60s psychedelia, progressive rock, and soul music. Apparently Columbia had no problem with this.

Peanut Butter Conspiracy…Chart Busters…Soulmates. Take six musicians: Patent Brian Mulder’s gravel-voice delivery. Add brass. Peter Lynch, Mike Spooner and Eddie Payne. Blend in Stuart Prestam’s drumming and Herbert Simon’s guitar riffs. Now you have it – the PBC sound. Here’s their debut album to confirm your suspicions. This is South Africa’s pop discovery of the 70s.

peanut butter conspiracy cover binnen gecomp watermark

source; liner notes Peanut Butter Conspiracy (CBS ASF 1627-South Africa)

and

Grendelmonster8u112 videos
New Haven, Connecticut, USA • YouTube

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Township Soul & Boogie Vol 12; Neville Nash ‘Wind Me Up’

February 3, 2015

Neville Nash 1981 2

 

Today’s post features all tracks from an early album by Nash ‘Wind Me Up’ released in 1981 in South Africa on his own label Nash

Neville Nash -Wind Me Up

Tracklist

A1 Wind Me Up  5:12
A2 Love Me Now 4:00
A3 Let The Music Play 3:53
B1 Funky Feelin’ 6:22
B2 Blame It On Magic 3:48
B3 Ooh Baby 3:31

Neville Nash 1981

Neville Nash and his band The Miracles parted ways when the South African singer went solo. By 1985 he had a big hit,”One Of Those Night”,which was later included in the Concert In The Park double album.”What’s Your Name,What’s Your Number?” produced by Tom Mkhise on the CTV label Solid. In 1986 he followed up with the album “Why?” which featured the hit “Feel It” produced by Tom Mkhise, Solly Letwaba and Neville himself.

Neville Nash

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Diggin’ in Japan; vol 6 Osaka Dec 2014 by MP Flapp

January 23, 2015

 

in addition to MP Flapp’s previous post on diggin’ in Japan here is his report on Osaka.

see also Diggin’ in Japan; vol 5 Tokyo Dec 2014 by MP Flapp

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Next stop Osaka.

Osaka is just over three hours from Tokyo by shinkansen. Unlike Tokyo Shin-Osaka where the shinkansen arrives is about 20 minutes from downtown Osaka by metro. Namba is a recommended spot to find a hotel as two large groupings of records stores exist in this area. The first is roughly between Shinsaibashi and Yotsubashi metro stations. The second is south-west of the main Namba railway station. Between the two there are in excess of twenty record stores. A third area with about five stores exists just south of Nakazakicho metro station.

Complementing the stores, from 26th December for four days, the Hanshin Department Store at Umeda plays host to a record fair. Recommended for the fact many stores not based in Osaka are represented at the fair. The stores from Osaka who sell at the fair tend to use it as a means to offload excess stock at sensible prices. It is still worth visiting the stores in person as many of the more obtuse or rare records remain in store and not at the fair. The fair is a bit different to European fairs in the organised loosely by genre/theme across a number of tables. None of the sellers are present, but their stock is tagged up according. You basically build up a pile of records from across all the sellers. Go to the inspection area where you can check the records, returning any that are not up to scratch. Then proceed to the check-out areas where you pay for and get your finds bagged. A bit odd the first time you do it, but I have to say it is fairly efficient.

Osaka  shop 1

Possibly the biggest difference between Tokyo and Osaka for record shopping is that there is less need for public transport. You can for the most part walk between stores and as such Osaka is a fairly laid back shopping experience. The shops are as equally well stocked as Tokyo, but there are just slightly less of them.

Some recommendations? Bamboo Music is closest to Nakazakicho metro station and a little out of the way, but is always worth a visit for the Jazz, soul and funk based selection. One of those stores with something for every pocket and quite a few titles you only ever see on-line. At the other end of town near Namba station you’ll find Naka Records. The store is a good starting point for the area as it often has a map for the other stores in the vicinity, and is a great source of lounge, easy and Japanese 45s. A short walk from Naka you’ll find Wild One Records. A delight of a store for Folk and Progressive rock music fans. The store is sensibly priced and has something for every pocket. Heading up to Shinsaibashi there is a great little club based music port of call called Rare Groove Records. Again the shop stocks a great range of LPs, 12s and 45s. They also have flyer map for the other stores in that area, a number of which are in the same building. A short walk from here and close to Yotsubashi metro station you’ll find Maru Ka Batsu. The store has existed for some years and has a great stock of 80s focused punk, alternative and industrial music. It’s well stocked in other areas too, but the aforementioned genres are always a distinct highlight. I often make this the last top of the day as at the end of the street the store is on you’ll find craft beer bar Kamikaze. It’s always a pleasure to drink there at the end of the day.

 

As short as this piece is you’ve probably guessed that with not too much effort and a bit of time it’s possible to discover a fantastic range of stores with an equally eclectic stock of records at a range of prices that makes record collecting available to every type of buyer. It’s not all about finding super rare records for three figure sums of money, but discovering new music that excites you and at a price you can afford. Saying that, if luck’s on your side you might just find that grail along the way by chance…

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Notes:

  1. The for the Japanese record map book is http://recordmap.com/
  2. List of Five Independent stores in Tokyo. All of the following stores can easily be found via Google. Flash Disc Ranch and Yellow Pop both in Shimo-Kitazawa. Record Sya in Jinbouchou. Sonota (aka Manual of Errors) and El Sur Records both in Shibuya.
  3. List of Five Independent stores in Osaka. All of the following stores can easily be found via Google. Bamboo Records, Naka Records, Wild One Records, Rare Groove Records and Maru Ka Batsu
  4. For Sound Cafe Dzumi check https://www.facebook.com/SoundCafedzumi or www.dzumi.jp
  5. Two recommend craft beer bars that do a fine range of food in Osaka are as follows: Craft Beer Works Kamikaze (see http://www.cbw-kamikaze.com/) and Lezzet Craft Beer & Food Experience Bar (see http://ameblo.jp/lezzetcraftbeer)
  6. The Record Sale. A good resource for finding information on occasional record sales is http://www.oneboxrecordfair.com/. As well as organising the One Box Record Fair the site highlights other similar events.
  7. One record sale well worth investigating if you are in Tokyo on 14th and 15th Feb. 2015 is organised by Enan formally of the Turntable store. The details of the record fair are at https://www.facebook.com/Turntable-Tokyo/. This one takes place in a rented space, so is a little bit bigger than a bar sale. A short clip of one of Enan’s previous events is here http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=QJQQZBjpUKo
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Diggin’ in Japan; vol 5 Tokyo Dec 2014 by MP Flapp

January 9, 2015

today brings an exciting post by guest editor MP Flapp who recently came back fully loaded from a trip to Japan and who is so generous to share his experiences on this blog. Regard it as an additional update to the published previous posts of diggin’ in Japan. First up is his report on Tokyo, next post will cover Osaka.

see also diggin’ in Japan vol 1; Tokyo record shops 

see also diggin’ in Japan vol 2; Osaka finds 

see also diggin’ in Japan, vol 3; One Box Record Fair Tokyo 

see also diggin’ in Japan vol 4-El Sur Records Tokyo-interview with Takashi Harada (translation in Japanese)

MP Flapp in Tokyo Dec 14

Diggin’ for gold in Tokyo -December 2014

by guest editor MP Flapp

Sometimes the best trips to look for records happen more by chance than design. This is one of those. It’s December and the year is running out. I’ve still not taken a proper holiday. Where’s best place to go to score some vinyl, chill a little, eat well and tactically avoid the commercial excesses of the season? It might come as a surprise that Japan would be the answer.

It’s actually a good time to go. It’s out-with the regular tourist season, the flights tend to be a bit cheaper, the hotels tend not to be fully booked, the shinkansen trains not overly busy, the weather can have an autumnal air, the shops are open every day and many record stores have end of year sales combined with the fact they pull out their top stock for the lure of the salary man’s bonus.

I’ve been to Japan more than once to buy records, so have a collection of maps and notes put together over the years with some valuable local assistance as a starting point. Having someone locally to point you in the right direction helps a lot, like anywhere else shops open, close and move, so one year’s good spots don’t necessary hold true for the next.

Until a few years ago the best guide to finding stores was the “Record Map”, a Japanese text only book detailing the locations of record and CD stores in almost every city in the country. It was never fully comprehensive, but as a guide it was invaluable. It ceased to be published in 2013. However, a sign that interest in stores and buying used music may be picking up is that the book is back on the shelves as a new and updated edition as of December 2014. The publication date was a bit late for this expedition as I was already on the ground when the book hit the shops.

This trip I’ve decided to focus on two locations: Tokyo and Osaka. Fly in to Tokyo spend some days there, travel to Osaka for a few more days, then return to Tokyo for a couple of days, before flying home on New Year’s Eve.

In my opinion, even if you drive, the best way to get between and around these cities is with the aid of the JR Rail Pass. Once you have the pass (the voucher is bought in advance of travelling to Japan) you are free to travel on any JR train. There are some exceptions with travelling on the shinkansen. The pass isn’t valid for a small number of superfast trains. However, the majority of shinkansen you can travel on by just making a reservation prior to boarding.

One thing I did differently to previous trips was to take a cheap Wi-Fi enabled tablet device. Given the short notice of the trip all I had was a rough plan with nothing fixed. Unlike a number of other countries cafes and bars tend not to have free Wi-Fi. All the hotels I stayed in had free Wi-Fi. So with this in mind all I did was firm up a plan for the day the night before and make sure any maps and the like were in an off-line form for browsing on the hoof.

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Tokyo

For the first few days in Tokyo I usually focus on three main areas: Shibuya (with a side trip to Shimokitazawa), Shinjuku and Ochanomizu (with a side trip on foot to Jinbouchou). It’s a fairly easy circle of stores on the metro and in each of the areas there are enough shops dominated by the spread of Disk Unions to make finding your feet and common titles fairly easy. Disk Union is the dominant used music chain in Tokyo. However, in the vicinity of the stores in Shinjuku and Ochanomizu there are some other great independent stores well worth checking. Sadly a few of the regular spots in the Jinbouchou area (Turntable for example) have closed.

Although at least in Turntable’s case the entity still exists. Admittedly off the high street. Enan (the former proprietor of Turntable), having shut the physical store still operates privately and through the pop-up one day record sale. I made it to one such record sale in Jinbouchou. The record sales are usually held in a bar or small hall for one day with a few sellers offering a limited set of stock from boxes. The sale is usually wrapped in a very social setting with both sellers and buyers soundtracking the event by playing records for each other whilst discussing music. More of a house party style event in a bar than a formal record fair. The sales seem to be a welcome new trend, with the stock available and those selling varying from event-to-event.

There have been some changes in the records available and the prices since my last trip. As of 1st April 2014 sales tax went up to 8%. It’s often possible to see the price less tax and with tax on the price sticker on the record. Very few stores add the tax on unexpectedly, so what you see on the sticker is the price. One type of record I collect is the Japanese vinyl editions of what might be classed as well known releases (David Bowie, Brian Eno, Scott Walker etc). These are the LP versions wrapped by an OBI strip round the cover with an insert or booklet specifically made for the edition. Complete, these records would appear to have become much harder to find over the years and a bit more expensive than they used to be. There are a few that have eluded me for more than one trip now. A complete copy of Fripp and Eno’s “Evening Star” in theory should be relatively straightforward to score. It isn’t. There are plenty of clean copies of great titles at super cheap prices, but complete top copies are becoming a challenge.

That said there is no shortage of records from about every conceivable geographical location and genre available in almost every store. There are some highly specialist stores that focus on a specific range of music, but in general most stores are across the board. It’s the main reason I come. It’s not just the availability and price of records (which is usually very competitive), but the fact you can zip round town on public transport and without really trying visit anywhere between ten and fifteen stores in any one day and do the same again the next without covering the same ground twice.

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Some recommendations? It goes without saying any of the Disk Unions are worth visiting. The stock turns over frequently and there is always a good range of records for every pocket. Of the independent stores in Shibuya I would recommend a visit to both Sonota (aka Manual of Errors) and El Sur Records. The former is a haven for the most obtuse mondo style records you’ve ever seen whilst the later has a broad range of world music with a healthy selection of African recordings (more CDs and less vinyl these days). One stop on the Keio Line on the express train from Shibuya is Shimokitazawa. Two notable spots here are Flash Disc Ranch for the selection of US used records combined with the sensible pricing policy and Yellow Pop whist not big is always good for turning up 80s alternative titles in top condition. The best Disk Union for Jazz is at Ochanomizu. A short walk from there in Jinbouchou is Record Sya. The store has existed on three floors for many years and is a great source for Japanese releases across almost every genre.

After all the digging for records you probably want a music related break for a drink. Tokyo has a wealth of unique music related café/bars. It’s really just a matter of finding them that is often the problem. Very few of these are often at street level and hence noticeable is passing. One distinct highlight of this trip was a visit to Sound Cafe Dzumi in Kichijoji. An upper floor haven for improvised and free jazz stoked with music and literature from the proprietors (Izumi Hideki) own archive. In addition to the Free Music Archive making regular radio broadcasts from the café they host frequent live performances.

 

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Notes:

  1. The for the Japanese record map book is http://recordmap.com/
  2. List of Five Independent stores in Tokyo. All of the following stores can easily be found via Google. Flash Disc Ranch and Yellow Pop both in Shimo-Kitazawa. Record Sya in Jinbouchou. Sonota (aka Manual of Errors) and El Sur Records both in Shibuya.
  3. List of Five Independent stores in Osaka. All of the following stores can easily be found via Google. Bamboo Records, Naka Records, Wild One Records, Rare Groove Records and Maru Ka Batsu
  4. For Sound Cafe Dzumi check https://www.facebook.com/SoundCafedzumi or http://www.dzumi.jp
  5. Two recommend craft beer bars that do a fine range of food in Osaka are as follows: Craft Beer Works Kamikaze (see http://www.cbw-kamikaze.com/) and Lezzet Craft Beer & Food Experience Bar (see http://ameblo.jp/lezzetcraftbeer)
  6. The Record Sale. A good resource for finding information on occasional record sales is http://www.oneboxrecordfair.com/. As well as organising the One Box Record Fair the site highlights other similar events
  7. One record sale well worth investigating if you are in Tokyo on 14th and 15th Feb. 2015 is organised by Enan formally of the Turntable store. The details of the record fair are at https://www.facebook.com/Turntable-Tokyo/. This one takes place in a rented space, so is a little bit bigger than a bar sale. A short clip of one of Enan’s previous events is here http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=QJQQZBjpUKo

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Happy New Year 2015 from Cape Town

January 1, 2015

Minstrel Carnival: Historic agreement reached – Patricia de Lille

Cape Town Mayor says City will provide financial and logistical support to ensure that the events are properly managed

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The Cape Cultural and Carnival Committee consists of representatives of the Minstrels, Malay Choirs and Christmas Bands responsible for organising events at various venues throughout the city.

These events start with the annual Minstrels Carnival during the festive season and end in April when the final competitions are held.

They are a highlight for many communities in Cape Town, and people come out in their thousands to watch the annual road marches and parades.

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This year the City will provide R2 million in funding to the committee to organise the various events.

This will go toward toilets, fencing, security, safety, medical services, logistics and public relations, to be arranged by the Cape Cultural and Carnival Committee.

These funds will be released to the Cape Cultural and Carnival Committee for the Minstrels, Malay Choirs and Christmas Bands and carnival events for 2014/2015.

Patricia de Lille – Mayor of Cape Town

 17 November 2014images (3)

 see also Kaapse Kloppe -Cape Town Carnival January 2nd 2013 Cape Town

Coon Carnival Time cover gecomp

Maurice Smith presents The Golden City Dixies in Coon Carnival Time.

With Majiet Omar, Henry Wilson, Alfred Stokes, Solly Bagus, Eddie Davis, Danny Williams and The Coon Carnival Band.

 

Side 1. Al die Dixies-Alfred Stokes/Die Doring –Henry Wilson/Nellie Gray –Majiet Omar/Rietjie In Die Water –Eddie Davis/Faith Can Move Mountains –Danny Williams.

Side 2. Sous Boonties –Henry Wilson/Grietjie –Majiet Omar/Gone Fishing –Majiet Omar and Alfred Stokes/Kossies Van Die Kaap –Eddie Davids/Apple Pickin’ Time In Georgia –Solly Bagus/My Mama Was ‘n Hottentot-Alfred Stikes/ Compere –Solly Bagus

see also songs and dances from Cape Malay fit for a king

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Yuletide 2014 with Dr.Thomas Chauke & Conny Chauke

December 22, 2014

I would like to end the year 2014 with the great uplifting music of a long standing South African performer whose music I have discovered recently. As I am enchanted by his singing and guitar playing I want to share a few songs by Thomas Chauke and his daughter Conny Chauke

Thomas Chauke is a South African musician who was born in Salema Village in the Limpopo province of South Africa. He performs and records under the band name Dr.Thomas Chauke na Shinyori Sisters. In 2013, he was presented with a MTN SAMA 19 Lifetime Achievement Award.Since the beginning of his career, Thomas Chauke has released over 30 albums which all reached gold, platinum, or double platinum status in South Africa.

This YouTube profile contains a lot of music and snippets of various video-clips so a good opportunity to discover the man’s musical output. Unfortunately the voice over is not in English, but let the music speak for itself. Wonderful and inspiring music!

…his daughter Conny Chauke also performs and has released a series of albums in her own right. Here is a song called ‘Buldoza’ -written by her father- from the album with the same title released in 1993 on Tusk Records (QBH 1167). Mesmerizing vocals and some great guitar playing.

Conny Chauke Na Shishashari Nr.1 -Buldoza

Conny Chauke

Conny Chauke

Merry Christmas & Happy Holidays to all of you!

compositie Bullseye-African mask 150 DPI pic

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diggin’ in Berlin -5 Essentials

December 8, 2014

diggin in berlinThanks to the field work of my collector friend MP Flapp I was excited about my record diggin’ trip to Berlin last week.

I was told that the city has an amazing array of recordshops specialising in second hand vinyl and after a week of diggin’ I must admit that the choice of shops is simply overwhelming. There must be over 35 recordshops that are less or more worthwile a visit.

I only managed to visit 5 or so and a few turned out to be real winners. Here is a small selection of the ones I visited.

My general impression of the shops is mixed as I understand that these days the database of Discogs is the standard indication for the value of second hand vinyl. Pricing according to Discogs is now common practice also in shops like Disk Union in Tokyo, Japan but spoils the fun since it eleminates finding ‘real’ bargains and is very time consuming.

Make sure to get good maps of the city and subway/public transport as Berlin is huge and some shops are located in not so central neighbourhoods. Public transport is not always easy as there is choice between U bahn, S bahn and several buses/trams. Also the numbering of the streets differs from elsewhere in Europe. So make sure to orientate yourself and check the hours of business before you go. Most shops open around noon or later and stay open untill 20.00h. Buy a day pass for euro 6,70 which allows usage of all forms of public transport.

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Best area to start is Kreuzberg where you will find Record Loft, the newest hot spot for dj’s diggers and collectors alike. Huge amount of sorted boxes with all genres of electronic dance music available. Also big section of disco, some reggae, experimental and small choice of African/Latin but the staple here is Electronic Dance Music as the shop is frequented by dj’s mainly who buy and sell their collections. The shop is only open since 1 year or so and there is still a lot to improve imo. I came around 4 o’clock in the afternoon when it was already dark outside. I understand that the shop normally has daylight streaming inside from the windows but in the evening the space is so badly lit that it is very hard to check the condition of the vinyl. Plenty of listening stations around to audio grade your discs though.

Another minor point of Record Loft is the system of pricing. No record is priced individually but checked upon the database of Discogs. This policy is based upon the lowest price in Euro for VG+ condition found on the Discogs database. A new sort of system that I found confusing and disturbing since I have no idea what pressing, what country of release, what sort of condition the guy behind the counter is referring to. It takes also a long time when you bring a stack to the counter. But the selection is huge and satisfying and I got a few goodies although I could not find enough time or enthousiasm to browse for a long time. The shop is located in a courtyard on Adalbert Strasse 9.

Record Loft, Adalbert Strasse 9, Berlin. U Bahn-U8 Kottbuser Tor Mon to Fr. 12 – 20 Uhr and Sa. 12 – 18 Uhr

Heisse Scheiben Records –One of my favourite shops in town. Well laid out shop space, plenty of original second hand vinyl in every sort of genre with a strong handpicked selection of Rock, African, Latin, Jazz, Reggae. Their new arrivals section (Neuzugänge) is not to be missed. Reasonably priced and well stocked. CD’s and 1 euro records in front, great choice of selected secondhand vinyl in the back room. Listening posts in the front of the shop. You will not leave empty handed here.

Heisse Scheiben Records, Ohlauer St 44, 10999 Berlin. U Bahn-U8 Hermann Platz or Görlitzer Bhf http://www.heisse-scheiben.de Mon to Fr. 12 – 19 Uhr and Sa. 12 – 18 Uhr

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Heisse Scheiben frontroom

Heisse Scheiben frontroom

Heisse Scheiben -backroom

Heisse Scheiben -backroom

Further up in the Ohlauer St you will find Wowsville, a combination of cafe, bar and small record shop in the back.

The main focus here is punk, gothic, rockabilly & assorted trash. There is a small section of soul, disco and lots of overpriced 45’s. I couldn’t resist hanging out in the cafe in the front where you will be entertained by Berlin’s most funky, grungy, punky hipsters. Great for drinks and some collectable records but expect to pay big money for a rather common selection.

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Wowsville, Ohlauer St 33, 10999 Berlin. U Bahn-U8 Hermann Platz or Görlitzer Bhf Mon to Sat. 12 – 20 Uhr

Within walking distance is A&V Records, a dependance of O-Ton Records where the cheaper –lesser graded stuff from O-Ton- finds a place in the boxes. All records are 5 euro, 8 euro for doubles and there are plenty of cheapies to be found in the boxes of 1,5 -3-5 euro but don’t count to pay these set prices. After digging a good few hours I had a stack of 20 or so just to hear from the girl behind the counter that most of my selection of 1,5 euro records were not priced as such. ‘Yes, these records were probably not placed back in the right box, your selection is all 5 euro’ was her excuse. GRRRRRR…digger’s nightmare!!! Thanks to my lucky stars I still got quite a few good finds worth that money but I would advise to sort the stock correctly or some punters will not agree and business will be lost.

A&V Records, Friedelstrasse 7, 12047 Berlin. U Bahn-U8 Hermann Platz Open: Mo.-Su. 12:00 – 20:00 The shop is a dependance of O Ton Records Krossener Str.18, Friedrichshain, 10245

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My favourite of this December trip must be Platten Pedro, an oldschool record store in every sense. Huge selection of secondhand vinyl with lots and lots of genres. Great selection of reggae, jazz, soundtracks etc. Most of the stock is common but in between some real rarities might turn up. Again, nothing is priced individually but the grumpy yet charming owner will give good prices and discounts. Based on his own knowledge and experience and not on Discog’s database. Phew! And he will enchant you with his stories on the history of Berlin. Take out some time as both well stocked rooms of this store deserves a good diggin’. Listening post in the back. Platten Pedro is a bit out the way since it is in West Berlin but it is worth the trip. Go left as you come out the U bahn station, turn left on the Tegelerweg. Nice shop for early morning diggin and worth the detour.

Platten Pedro, Tegelerweg 102, Berlin. U Bahn-U2 Jungfernheide Bhf Mon to Sat. 10 – 20 Uhr

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Not really my favourite but if you are around the Tegelerweg then check out Rocksteady Music, another ‘classic recordstore’ which stocks new & 2nd hand vinyl records from different styles: 50’s / 60’s / 70’s / 80’s / 90’s / 00’s, also lots of CD’s. Some good finds here if you are looking for unwanted dj collections and cheapos. I found some nice reggae and a great Fela LP. Priced to sell and some  real collectors, mostly pop and rock.

Rocksteady Music, Zille Str 74. Berlin 10585. U Bahn-U7 Bismarckstr or S42

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I stayed at the Mani Hotel, Torstr. 136,10119 Berlin U Bahn-U5 Rosenthaler Platz.

Fabulous and sexy boutique hotel, just a stones throw from the Rosenthaler Platz U bahn station. Small rooms yet comfortable in every sense. Modern design and the best beds ever. Affordable rates. There are plenty of good restaurants, shops and breakfast places around.

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